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    Latin

    My question is I was doing Lesson 4, worksheet 5, drill D in third form, when I noticed they wanted me to put down the gender for some pronouns. In Second Form I think I remember being taught that pronouns don't have their own gender but match the subject of the sentence. I was confused because in this exercise pronoun was the subject of the sentence so I didn't know what the gender was. I looked in the text book but couldn't find the answer anywhere. I was wondering if you could help. TIA.

    Sincerely,

    Maria's daughter
    DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
    DS 10, using 5M core

    #2
    Re: Latin

    Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
    My question is I was doing Lesson 4, worksheet 5, drill D in third form, when I noticed they wanted me to put down the gender for some pronouns. In Second Form I think I remember being taught that pronouns don't have their own gender but match the subject of the sentence. I was confused because in this exercise pronoun was the subject of the sentence so I didn't know what the gender was. I looked in the text book but couldn't find the answer anywhere. I was wondering if you could help. TIA.

    Sincerely,

    Maria's daughter
    Good morning,

    The gender of the 1st and 2nd person pronouns (the ones you learned in Second Form) are determined by the antecedent, the noun to which the pronoun refers. However, this exercise is asking for the gender not of the pronoun but of the participle. Unlike all of the other verb forms you have learned, the perfect passive is comprised of two words, a participle and a form of sum. The participle will agree with the subject of the sentence in gender, number, and case. In a sentence with a personal pronoun subject, the participle's gender matches the pronoun's, which matches the antecedent's. Notice that two words agree in gender with the pronoun: the antecedent (which we don't know) and the participle (which we do know). For example, in #7 the pronoun's antecedent must be feminine because the participle is feminine. The same is true for #8. The errors are the verb's person (#7) and the participle's number (#8).

    Does that help? If not, please feel free to ask further questions!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Latin

      Thank you, that really cleared things up. I was able to complete my exercise. Thanks again!

      Sincerely, Faustina
      DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
      DS 10, using 5M core

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Latin

        Another homework question...Lesson 5 Worksheet 6, number 10. I am not sure why perturbavit isn't perturbaverunt? The answer key translates it as "The grain has been taken by the Romans because the people disturbed the peace." But pertubavit means h/s/i disturbed, not they disturbed, so I am confused...
        DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
        DS 10, using 5M core

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Latin

          Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
          Another homework question...Lesson 5 Worksheet 6, number 10. I am not sure why perturbavit isn't perturbaverunt? The answer key translates it as "The grain has been taken by the Romans because the people disturbed the peace." But pertubavit means h/s/i disturbed, not they disturbed, so I am confused...
          People is the English translation of populus, a singular noun in Latin. Because the subject and verb must agree in person and number, the verb will also be singular. We actually had a thread all about the words populus and people just a couple months ago. Here's a link to it if you'd like to learn more about these words.

          Let me know if this didn't help or you have more questions!
          Michael
          Memoria Press

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Latin

            That cleared things up, thank you!
            DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
            DS 10, using 5M core

            Comment


              #7
              I am hoping to have some help. My mom told me to ask here when she can't help me with a question. I hope that is ok. I'm doing lesson 12 for Third Form and I'm confused about something. If an adjective "governs" a certain case, does that mean said adjective is always in that case? And if so, do you match the case of the noun you are modifying, to the case of the adjective? Also, is it necessary for the adjectives I'm learning in this lesson to be completed by a prepositional phrase? It is hard to put my question into words, I am sorry if this is unclear.

              Faustina
              DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
              DS 10, using 5M core

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
                I am hoping to have some help. My mom told me to ask here when she can't help me with a question. I hope that is ok. I'm doing lesson 12 for Third Form and I'm confused about something. If an adjective "governs" a certain case, does that mean said adjective is always in that case? And if so, do you match the case of the noun you are modifying, to the case of the adjective? Also, is it necessary for the adjectives I'm learning in this lesson to be completed by a prepositional phrase? It is hard to put my question into words, I am sorry if this is unclear.

                Faustina
                Yes, it's perfectly fine to ask questions on this forum!

                When we say that an adjective "governs" a particular case, it means that the adjective can take an object in that case. The adjective itself will still agree with the noun it modifies in gender, number, and case. To start, here's a simple sentence without an adjective:

                Puella sedet. The girl is sitting.

                Puella is nominative feminine singular and the subject of the sentence. If we want to say, "The eager girl is sitting," then the Latin word for eager, cupidus, would also be nominative feminine singular to agree with puella:

                Puella cupida sedet. The eager girl is sitting.

                Now, if we want to say for what the girl is is eager, then we would use the case that cupidus governs, the genitive:

                Puella cupida cenae sedet. The girl, eager for dinner, is sitting.

                Doe that help? If not, or if you have any further questions, please let me know!
                Michael
                Memoria Press

                Comment

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