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    Third Form Latin

    Student Text Lesson 14, page 49, Vocabulary: It says, "ordo ordinis" is masculine and points out that it's an exception to the norm, but the video and the flash cards say that it's feminine.

    Student Workbook, page 114, Drill D, #11: It says, "navigemus." Shouldn't it say, "navigamus?"

    I also have a question. Are possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs) taught?
    Cheryl, mom to:

    ds 24, graduated
    ds 23, graduated
    dd 15, 9th Grade
    dd 12, 6th Grade
    ds 10, 4nd Grade

    #2
    Re: Third Form Latin

    Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post
    Student Text Lesson 14, page 49, Vocabulary: It says, "ordo ordinis" is masculine and points out that it's an exception to the norm, but the video and the flash cards say that it's feminine.

    Student Workbook, page 114, Drill D, #11: It says, "navigemus." Shouldn't it say, "navigamus?"

    I also have a question. Are possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs) taught?
    Good morning,

    1. The Student Text is correct.

    2. "Navigemus" is the 1st person present subjunctive while "navigamus" is the 1st person present indicative. The present subjunctive will be taught in Unit 4 of Third Form, so even if it's correct (My books are at the office.), we still need to change it. Thanks!

    3. The 1st and 2nd person possessive pronouns were taught in Second Form Latin. The 3rd person ones will be taught in Unit 3 of Third Form.
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Third Form Latin

      Originally posted by Michael View Post
      Good morning,

      1. The Student Text is correct.

      2. "Navigemus" is the 1st person present subjunctive while "navigamus" is the 1st person present indicative. The present subjunctive will be taught in Unit 4 of Third Form, so even if it's correct (My books are at the office.), we still need to change it. Thanks!

      3. The 1st and 2nd person possessive pronouns were taught in Second Form Latin. The 3rd person ones will be taught in Unit 3 of Third Form.
      Thank you. Regarding #3, my daughter is wondering if there are words (possessive pronouns) that can be used as the subject of a sentence. For example, "Mine is on the table," (mine is the subject) vs. "My book is on the table." (my is modifying book). She just looked through Second Form and the genitive of the first and second personal pronouns are translated "of me," "of us," "of you," and "of you all" and don't show possession (more like a prepositional phrase in English). Is she missing something?
      Cheryl, mom to:

      ds 24, graduated
      ds 23, graduated
      dd 15, 9th Grade
      dd 12, 6th Grade
      ds 10, 4nd Grade

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Third Form Latin

        Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post
        Thank you. Regarding #3, my daughter is wondering if there are words (possessive pronouns) that can be used as the subject of a sentence. For example, "Mine is on the table," (mine is the subject) vs. "My book is on the table." (my is modifying book). She just looked through Second Form and the genitive of the first and second personal pronouns are translated "of me," "of us," "of you," and "of you all" and don't show possession (more like a prepositional phrase in English). Is she missing something?
        The possessive pronoun adjectives, like other adjectives, can be used as nouns. When used as a noun, the possessive pronoun adjective will agree in gender and number with whatever the expressed noun would have been. For example:
        • Mater: "Ubi, puellae, sunt libri vestri?" ("Girls, where are your books?")
        • Prima Puella: "Meus est sub mensa!" ("Mine is under the table!")

        In this example, the adjective "meus" is being used as a noun and is translated "mine." "Meus" is masculine singular because the implied noun is "liber" ("book"). "Meus" does not agree with the antecedent, the female speaker. Does that make sense?
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Third Form Latin

          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          The possessive pronoun adjectives, like other adjectives, can be used as nouns. When used as a noun, the possessive pronoun adjective will agree in gender and number with whatever the expressed noun would have been. For example:
          • Mater: "Ubi, puellae, sunt libri vestri?" ("Girls, where are your books?")
          • Prima Puella: "Meus est sub mensa!" ("Mine is under the table!")

          In this example, the adjective "meus" is being used as a noun and is translated "mine." "Meus" is masculine singular because the implied noun is "liber" ("book"). "Meus" does not agree with the antecedent, the female speaker. Does that make sense?
          Thank you so much! She said that is exactly what she wanted to know and how she guessed it would be done, but she wasn't sure. Do you know if it's ever taught in this manner somewhere in the series?
          Cheryl, mom to:

          ds 24, graduated
          ds 23, graduated
          dd 15, 9th Grade
          dd 12, 6th Grade
          ds 10, 4nd Grade

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Third Form Latin

            Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post
            Thank you so much! She said that is exactly what she wanted to know and how she guessed it would be done, but she wasn't sure. Do you know if it's ever taught in this manner somewhere in the series?
            You're welcome!

            Adjectives used as nouns were taught back in Unit 2 of TFL, I think around Lesson 8.
            Michael
            Memoria Press

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Third Form Latin

              Originally posted by Michael View Post
              You're welcome!

              Adjectives used as nouns were taught back in Unit 2 of TFL, I think around Lesson 8.
              Thanks! She was confused because it didn't explicitly say what the translation would be.
              Cheryl, mom to:

              ds 24, graduated
              ds 23, graduated
              dd 15, 9th Grade
              dd 12, 6th Grade
              ds 10, 4nd Grade

              Comment

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