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First Form Explaining Past tenses....

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    First Form Explaining Past tenses....

    .....In two sentences: "After he had wrapped himself in bacon, Aiden was walking through the woods when he was eaten by a bear. He will be remembered fondly.". Pluperfect, imperfect, perfect, and future perfect. I think I am right, please feel free to correct me. My First Formers have trouble with these past tenses. I find this helps.

    #2
    Re: First Form Explaining Past tenses....

    Originally posted by Meginiowa View Post
    .....In two sentences: "After he had wrapped himself in bacon, Aiden was walking through the woods when he was eaten by a bear. He will be remembered fondly.". Pluperfect, imperfect, perfect, and future perfect. I think I am right, please feel free to correct me. My First Formers have trouble with these past tenses. I find this helps.
    Nice! A few notes:

    In Latin, had wrapped would be perfect active even though it is pluperfect in English. Was walking would be imperfect active. Was eaten would be perfect passive and will be remembered would be future (not future perfect) passive.

    What do you think of the following changes?

    Originally posted by Meginiowa View Post
    One hour after he had wrapped himself in bacon, Aiden was walking through the woods when a bear ate him. When his friends (will have) discovered this, they will remember him fondly.
    Now every verb is indicative active, and the same tense would be used in Latin and English. (One hour makes the had wrapped pluperfect in Latin too, and will remember is future active.)

    Overall, what a great way to remember the relationship between these tenses! Great job, and thanks for sharing!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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      #3
      Re: First Form Explaining Past tenses....

      Apparently my last reply did not post. How about this for better flow:

      "Only an hour after he had wrapped himself in bacon, Aiden was walking through the woods when a bear ate him. By the time the bear takes his Maalox, Aiden's friends will have discovered the tragedy and will remember him fondly. "has taken" may be more correct grammatically, but it sounds better (to my ear) this way and the verb in question is not cited as an example.

      Thank you for your prompt and sympathetic response!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: First Form Explaining Past tenses....

        Originally posted by Meginiowa View Post
        Apparently my last reply did not post. How about this for better flow:

        "Only an hour after he had wrapped himself in bacon, Aiden was walking through the woods when a bear ate him. By the time the bear takes his Maalox, Aiden's friends will have discovered the tragedy and will remember him fondly. "has taken" may be more correct grammatically, but it sounds better (to my ear) this way and the verb in question is not cited as an example.

        Thank you for your prompt and sympathetic response!
        Sure! The discovering and remembering are happening in the future, but before the taking. In Latin, discover and remember would be future perfect and take would be future, with a word like antequam (before) joining the two clauses. English, however, is much looser with tenses, so if you'd rather say takes in English, that's fine.

        Thanks for the fun question!
        Michael
        Memoria Press

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