Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Forms of comparison for adj

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Forms of comparison for adj

    While learning forms of comparison for adjectives in Third Form, we were taught that adjectives whose stems end in a vowel, like arduus-a-um or dubius-a-um, would take on magis or maxime to form the comparative or superlative forms. Now in lesson 5 in Fourth Form we needed to decline a few adjectives, one of them being aequus-a-um. We declined it as though it took on magis and maxime, however, when I checked the answer key, it was declined using aequior, aequius. I double-checked the lesson to see if perhaps I missed the note that it was an exception, but I didn't see any mention of it. Could you please clarify whether it is an exception or if the answer in the manual was incorrect? Thank you!
    Audrey

    #2
    Re: Forms of comparison for adj

    Originally posted by howie4 View Post
    While learning forms of comparison for adjectives in Third Form, we were taught that adjectives whose stems end in a vowel, like arduus-a-um or dubius-a-um, would take on magis or maxime to form the comparative or superlative forms. Now in lesson 5 in Fourth Form we needed to decline a few adjectives, one of them being aequus-a-um. We declined it as though it took on magis and maxime, however, when I checked the answer key, it was declined using aequior, aequius. I double-checked the lesson to see if perhaps I missed the note that it was an exception, but I didn't see any mention of it. Could you please clarify whether it is an exception or if the answer in the manual was incorrect? Thank you!
    Audrey
    "Aequior" and "aequissimus" are correct. The "u" in "qu" is treated as a consonant as it makes a /w/ sound with the /k/ of "qu." Does that make sense?
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Forms of comparison for adj

      Thank you. Yes, that does make sense!
      Audrey

      Comment

      Working...
      X