Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

    Somnia Josephi (1) pg. 52 (end of 1st paragraph..."amari")

    "Videntes fratres eum a patre plus quam cunctos filios amari, eum oderunt.
    The brothers, seeing him loved more by his father than all his brothers, they hate him.

    I know that 'amo, amare amavi amatus' are the principal parts for the verb, 'to love' and that 'amarus -a -um' = bitter

    But I am confused as to how 'amari' here means loved since the ending seems wrong and/or I do not know what I am doing! Please help!

    Thanks so much,
    Brenda

    #2
    Re: Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

    Originally posted by omma View Post
    Somnia Josephi (1) pg. 52 (end of 1st paragraph..."amari")

    "Videntes fratres eum a patre plus quam cunctos filios amari, eum oderunt.
    The brothers, seeing him loved more by his father than all his brothers, they hate him.

    I know that 'amo, amare amavi amatus' are the principal parts for the verb, 'to love' and that 'amarus -a -um' = bitter

    But I am confused as to how 'amari' here means loved since the ending seems wrong and/or I do not know what I am doing! Please help!

    Thanks so much,
    Brenda
    Absolutely! Videntes is introducing what is called an indirect statement. In English, indirect statements are often introduced by the word "that." So, we could rewrite the given translation as, "The brothers, seeing THAT HE IS LOVED more ..."

    In an indirect statement, the verb is put in the infinitive. Since "is loved" is passive, we have to use a passive infinitive. In the 1st conjugation, the present passive infinitive ends in -ari instead of -are, so the present passive infinitive of amo is amari. The context and structure of the sentence make it clear that the meaning is "is loved" and not "bitter," although the brothers were clearly bitter at Joseph!

    Does that answer your question? This is definitely a more advanced grammatical concept. In our program, we do not teach indirect statements until Fourth Form Latin.
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

      Originally posted by Michael View Post
      Absolutely! Videntes is introducing what is called an indirect statement. In English, indirect statements are often introduced by the word "that." So, we could rewrite the given translation as, "The brothers, seeing THAT HE IS LOVED more ..."

      In an indirect statement, the verb is put in the infinitive. Since "is loved" is passive, we have to use a passive infinitive. In the 1st conjugation, the present passive infinitive ends in -ari instead of -are, so the present passive infinitive of amo is amari. The context and structure of the sentence make it clear that the meaning is "is loved" and not "bitter," although the brothers were clearly bitter at Joseph!

      Does that answer your question? This is definitely a more advanced grammatical concept. In our program, we do not teach indirect statements until Fourth Form Latin.
      Yes, this is so helpful, although I really have to stretch my mind on this one (which is part of why I like Latin so much)! I don't think I have learned passive infinitives yet, either. So am I correct in thinking of the passive infinitive as a kind of state of being loved?

      Thanks...lots to ponder!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

        Originally posted by omma View Post
        Yes, this is so helpful, although I really have to stretch my mind on this one (which is part of why I like Latin so much)! I don't think I have learned passive infinitives yet, either. So am I correct in thinking of the passive infinitive as a kind of state of being loved?

        Thanks...lots to ponder!
        Yes. A simpler example would be

        Debeo amare. I ought to love.
        Debeo amari. I ought to be loved.

        I agree: Latin does stretch the mind, and that's part of what makes it so fun!
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Lingua Biblica Lectio Sexta translation question

          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          Yes. A simpler example would be

          Debeo amare. I ought to love.
          Debeo amari. I ought to be loved.

          I agree: Latin does stretch the mind, and that's part of what makes it so fun!

          Perfect!!! Thanks, again, Michael! I am sort of tutoring a small class through Lingua Biblica (even while I am still learning this 'stuff') and so I especially appreciate the simplified explanations and examples. Yeah!!!

          Comment

          Working...
          X