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Third Form Lesson I

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    Third Form Lesson I

    I'm teaching Third Form Latin for the first time this year. I found the Third Form errata sheet, but I still have a question about Lesson I Worksheet 6 (p. 12). Under VII. Translation, question 9, the translation for 'by the enemy' is 'ab hostibus'. However, based on Second Form Latin, we learned that 'a' is used before words which begin with a consonant sound. Since 'hostis' is a 3rd declension i-stem noun, hostibus is ablative plural. Should the translation for 'by the enemy' be 'a hoste' instead? What am I missing here? I appreciate your help in this matter.

    Thanks!
    Beth in Central TX

    #2
    Re: Third Form Lesson I

    Originally posted by Beth in Central TX View Post
    I'm teaching Third Form Latin for the first time this year. I found the Third Form errata sheet, but I still have a question about Lesson I Worksheet 6 (p. 12). Under VII. Translation, question 9, the translation for 'by the enemy' is 'ab hostibus'. However, based on Second Form Latin, we learned that 'a' is used before words which begin with a consonant sound. Since 'hostis' is a 3rd declension i-stem noun, hostibus is ablative plural. Should the translation for 'by the enemy' be 'a hoste' instead? What am I missing here? I appreciate your help in this matter.

    Thanks!
    Beth in Central TX
    Ab hostibus is actually correct. The Romans used ab before words beginning with h, and we forgot to mention this exception when we taught ab in Second Form. We will mention that exception in the next reprint. Sorry for the confusion!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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      #3
      Re: Third Form Lesson I

      Why is the plural used here? Is it another exception? I'm just trying to take notes so that I can explain it in class. Thanks again!

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        #4
        Re: Third Form Lesson I

        The Romans liked to use hostis in the plural because they thought of the "enemy" as a bunch of enemies. The singular "enemy" sounds more natural in English so that is why the Latin plural is translated singular. Does that make sense?
        Michael
        Memoria Press

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          #5
          Re: Third Form Lesson I

          Yes, that makes sense. Enemy can be a singular noun or a collective noun in English. It's used in the collective sense in this sentence. Thank you for your time this morning! ~Beth

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