Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

L.C. II XI question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    L.C. II XI question

    In Exercise B #7 the sentence reads: "The farmers are moving the lambs into the field." The answer uses the accusative form of the Latin word field - agrum. However, the word "lambs" is the direct object of the sentence and field a prepositional object which would require the ablative ending "o". Does anyone have an explanation for why the ending "um" is used?

    #2
    agrum?!

    4boys,

    The preposition "in" can take both the ablative and the accusative cases. However, it is translated differently in both cases. When in takes the ablative there is a more stationary idea.

    in the city
    on the wall

    they're not moving, they're just sitting there. When in takes the accusative case however more motion is suggested, and in can mean

    into the city
    against the wall

    In the sentence you gave, they are going "into the field" suggested motion/destination requires the use of the accusative.

    Glen Moore
    thanks!
    Glen Moore
    [url]www.[B]M[/url][/B]emoria[B]P[/B]ress.com/course

    Comment


      #3
      Thank

      Glenn,

      Thank you so much for the explanation.

      Comment

      Working...
      X