Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Errata for Second Form Latin Review answer key?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Errata for Second Form Latin Review answer key?

    I found the errata for the main Second Form Latin texts and workbooks, but I'm looking for an errata for the "Second Form Latin Review" workbook and answer key, which we're using during the summer. I have seen a few errors and wanted to cross-check with known errata before compiling them.

    #2
    Here is the errata! I'm the person to see about Latin errors, so send them my way.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks; I'd found that file already but it doesn't seem to have any errata from the review book. In any case, I'll send bits along once we're done with the book in early August.

      Comment


        #4
        My apologies, I misread; here's the Second Form Latin REVIEW errata.

        Comment


          #5

          Thanks; we have a much longer list put together that I'll post soon (we're almost done with our summer review).

          One question, which isn't exactly an errata. In Unit IV, Section V, Translation #4, the given translation for magistri liberi is "free teachers." All three of us translated this as "teacher's children" (with corresponding changes in the dictionary forms). Is there any reason this is not a legitimate answer as well? Does the word order perhaps implies "free teachers" more strongly? The sentence itself doesn't seem to give a strong indication either way, but I imagine a paragraph surrounding a sentence like this in classical literature would make the appropriate translation clear.


          Comment


            #6
            You are right that without context magistri liberi could be either free teachers or children of the teacher. I think you could give credit either way.

            But I lean toward the Key answer. As far as word order, magistri liberi as free teachers fits the guideline that an adjective of quality usually follows the noun. (As a genitive may precede or follow its noun depending on sentence structure and other reasons, there really is no clue as to whether magistri is genitive singular or nominative plural.)

            Your instinct to look to context where available is wise. Although there is no larger passage here, I certainly think that the writer of the question had in mind the contrast between paedagogi, very often educated Greek slaves (or freedmen) who taught Roman children, as opposed to magistri, schoolmasters/teachers who were, as in this phrase, liberi, free. Of course, a Second Form student would not be expected to know that, but as students progress through the language, they pick up more and more historical information that will supply clues in reading Latin.

            Bonnie

            Comment

            Working...
            X