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First Form p. 37 student text

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    First Form p. 37 student text

    We are confused as to why the student book p. 37 lists all the verbs in the English infinitive form (i.e. to accuse) when the Latin words are actually written in the 1st principal part (i.e. accuso)? My child recited them in the infinitive form because that is what the book said, but on the Lesson 13 test (p. 2) the answers are in the 1st principal part so this was confusing to her.

    #2
    Originally posted by KariE View Post
    We are confused as to why the student book p. 37 lists all the verbs in the English infinitive form (i.e. to accuse) when the Latin words are actually written in the 1st principal part (i.e. accuso)? My child recited them in the infinitive form because that is what the book said, but on the Lesson 13 test (p. 2) the answers are in the 1st principal part so this was confusing to her.
    Good afternoon,

    The standard entry form for a Latin verb is the 1st person singular of the present tense, e.g., amo. However, the standard way to give the English definition of that Latin verb is with the infinitive, e.g., to love. (English dictionaries follow a similar approach: One must look up love, not to love, but all of the definitions will begin with to.) FFL students did not learn about dictionary form until Lesson 4, so the vocabulary lists in Lessons 1-3 use the literal translation of the entry form, e.g., I love. By the Lesson 13 Test, however, the key should have given the English answers in the infinitive form. Thank you for catching this, and my apologies for the confusion it caused!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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