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1st yr. Henle Answer Key

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    1st yr. Henle Answer Key

    For exercise 173, number 6.

    The English states: Do you hear the cries and shouting of the cavalry?

    The answer key states: Audiuntne voces et clamorem equitum?

    My problem is with "of the cavalry" being translated as "equitum." If calvary (a 4th dec. word) is declined in the genitive case wouldn't it be equitus or equituum. Is it being declined as the direct object (accusative case) singular? If so, why?

    Thank you,
    Lilli

    #2
    Similar words

    Dear Lilli,

    You apparently confused two similar words, eques a 2nd dec. word and equitatus a fourth dec. word. Eques is equitum when declined in the pl. genitive case.

    Blessings

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      #3
      I agree... but there's another problem with that sentence, if the translation is supposed to be "do YOU hear" then the verb should be audisne.

      Glen
      thanks!
      Glen Moore
      [url]www.[B]M[/url][/B]emoria[B]P[/B]ress.com/course

      Comment


        #4
        The YOU is plural. So the Henle sentence is correct.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: 1st yr. Henle Answer Key

          For exercise 60 #17, should "clamorem" be plural? Clamores?

          English: The commander in chief heard the shouts of the fathers.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: 1st yr. Henle Answer Key

            Originally posted by Marni View Post
            For exercise 60 #17, should "clamorem" be plural? Clamores?

            English: The commander in chief heard the shouts of the fathers.
            The Romans would sometimes use "clamor" in a sort of plural sense, e.g. the shouting (multiple shouts) of the soldiers. The plural of "clamor" may also be used though, so "clamores" is also correct in the above sentence.

            HTH!
            Michael
            Memoria Press

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