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LC lesson 2: "Rome was always victorious over her enemies."

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  • LC lesson 2: "Rome was always victorious over her enemies."

    Hi! My little one asked me to mention that Rome was not _always_ victorious over her enemies. In his book he simply corrected it to "sometimes".


  • serendipitous journey
    replied
    Re: LC lesson 2: "Rome was always victorious over her enemies."

    Originally posted by Michael View Post
    The Romans did sometimes lose battles, but I think this sentence is about more than battles. Rome, which started as a single town along the Tiber River, grew to rule much of the known world. The Romans ultimately conquered their Italian neighbors, then the Carthaginians, the Greeks, the Gauls, and finally all the lands surrounding the Mediterranean, a sea which they called Mare Nostrum (Our Sea). Until she slowly began to fall, Rome was always in the end victorious over her foes. And even when Rome finally fell, many aspects of her civilization survived. Her legacy, from her architecture to her law, was ultimately victorious over the would-be legacies of her foes. These victories had a profound effect on the direction of western civilization. It is to these victories that the above sentence refers and it is because of them that we used the adverb "always." Even if you ultimately decide to interpret the sentence differently, I hope something in this post was helpful to you
    Michael, this makes sense to me and is what I surmised might be meant.

    It seems to me that using "victorious" in this sense is robbing the word of its meaning: to leave an enduring legacy is not the same as to be always victorious over one's enemies. I suppose this claim may be one that Memoria Press makes, but do not see that it is a claim supported by history. Certainly not by historians, if one means professional historians as a body; like scientists, there are outliers with outlying perspectives.

    Thanks for hearing the concern!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Re: LC lesson 2: "Rome was always victorious over her enemies."

    Originally posted by serendipitous journey View Post
    Hi! My little one asked me to mention that Rome was not _always_ victorious over her enemies. In his book he simply corrected it to "sometimes".

    The Romans did sometimes lose battles, but I think this sentence is about more than battles. Rome, which started as a single town along the Tiber River, grew to rule much of the known world. The Romans ultimately conquered their Italian neighbors, then the Carthaginians, the Greeks, the Gauls, and finally all the lands surrounding the Mediterranean, a sea which they called Mare Nostrum (Our Sea). Until she slowly began to fall, Rome was always in the end victorious over her foes. And even when Rome finally fell, many aspects of her civilization survived. Her legacy, from her architecture to her law, was ultimately victorious over the would-be legacies of her foes. These victories had a profound effect on the direction of western civilization. It is to these victories that the above sentence refers and it is because of them that we used the adverb "always." Even if you ultimately decide to interpret the sentence differently, I hope something in this post was helpful to you

    Leave a comment:

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