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Not sure where to post - discrepancy b/t Guerber and Concise History

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    Not sure where to post - discrepancy b/t Guerber and Concise History

    I need help clearing up a discrepancy between my ds12's Guerber text and my dd14's Concise History text. Please note that we are using the latest version of MP's Guerber book and the 2nd Edition of Concise History.

    Lesson 19 (page 47) of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen Colonies and the Great Republic credits Oliver Cromwell with enacting the Navigation Act. "Cromwell made a new law called the Navigation Act (1651), which decreed that the colonists should build no more ships..." Lesson 20, page 48 goes on to state, "When Cromwell died in 1658 the English people reinstated the royal family and Charles II took the throne...".

    According to that text, the Navigation Act was put into play by Cromwell in 1651 and that he died 7 years later in 1658.



    However, chapters 2 and 3 of A Concise History of the American Republic differ. Chapter 2, page 30 states, "The civil war and other commotions, lasting from 1641 to 1653, when Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector of the English Commonwealth, afforded all three groups of colonies a chance to grow with a minimum of interference; and Oliver, too, decided to let well enough alone."

    Chapter 3, page 32 discusses mercantilism and states, "Now, through a series of Acts of Trade and Navigation (1660 - 72), an effort was made to make the English empire self-sustaining..."

    According to this text, it appears as though Oliver Cromwell did not meddle in the affairs of the colonists and that the Navigation Act was passed after he died.



    In order that we might have our dates straight and our acts together (ha!), can you please help clarify when the Navigation Act was actually passed and whether it was Cromwell or one of his successors who enacted it?
    Mary

    DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
    DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
    DD8 - SC level 2

    #2
    Good afternoon Mary,

    Both texts are actually correct! For the detailed explanation, I will defer to my esteemed colleague Shane:

    I apologize for the confusion! I hope this explanation will help.

    You are correct. Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector in 1654. Before he became Lord Protector, however, he had served as First Chairman of the Council of State in England. In other words, for the first few years after King Charles’ execution (1649), Cromwell was the acting chief executive of England, so he was responsible for the Navigation Act of 1651 as Guerber states on page 47.

    The Navigation Act of 1651 was passed in order to help England gain a competitive edge on their greatest trading rival at the time, the Dutch. Guerber omits any reference to the Dutch here, because she is emphasizing the negative impact this law had on the colonies.

    The Navigation Act of 1651 was different from the Navigation Acts of 1660-1672 in that the latter Navigation Acts specified particular products in the colonies that could be exported to England only. A Concise History of the American Republic groups these laws together to demonstrate that after the Protectorate, England began to pass official laws that directly regulated trade in America in a way that interfered with colonial trade.

    Guerber is making a similar point. She is demonstrating that England’s economic policies led to turmoil in the colonies, but for the sake of simplicity, she does not differentiate between the intent of the different Navigation Acts.
    HTH!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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      #3
      Thank you for this very clear and concise answer - it is actually very helpful.
      Mary

      DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
      DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
      DD8 - SC level 2

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