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On Creativity with Fable

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    On Creativity with Fable

    Hello friends, I would appreciate feedback on my 4A daughter’s writing. We just completed lesson 5 of Fable and this is her final draft. She has been coming up with some pretty creative takes on the fable stories. I have attached the latest, the shortest one she’s written. Some have been three pages long. She loves space, and often her retelling is based in space. I am happy with her creative take, and was surprised when she wrote the first lesson this way, without being promoted to have the characters and setting so different from the original.

    I am wondering if this is the “right” way to do these lessons and if continuing this way of retelling the fable will in any way work against her in the later levels. Maybe this is mentioned in the teaching material and I missed it? I am new to this style of teaching writing and haven’t watched any related MP teacher videos for CC, yet. We use the DVDs, teacher manual, and student guide. Thank you for any feedback!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Arrowmama; 12-24-2020, 04:07 PM.
    Rose
    DD1 - 16 (11th grade, Great Books student + dual enrollment)
    DD2 - 10 (MP 4A)
    DS - 2 (MP Preschool)

    #2
    That sounds pretty creative to me! We have kept to the truest intent of the stories until the directions asked us to change that. We have changed the color or type of animal, the type of farm or forest, the city and its geographical features (usually to fit in a figure of description like chorographia or geographia). I have not had my 2 students in Fable (we're on lesson 9) ask to take the story out of the planet or past the silly imagination of talking animals. In Lesson 12, students incorporate topothesia, a vivid description of an imaginary place. I think setting the story in space (where there aren't rivers of liquid water, living fish, or an oxygen-rich atmosphere where people talk without space suits, etc) would be an excellent application of that FOD.

    I bet the pros will have something to say having taught more levels, but right now I'm working my way through note-taking on the Narrative DVDs to teach next fall, and there are quite a few stories where this dramatic change of setting would not work at all, nor is it a requirement just yet. Otherwise, she appears to be implementing the FOD in her paraphrase very well.
    Mama to 2

    Summer:
    MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
    SY 20/21
    4A

    Comment


      #3
      Hello! It sounds like your daughter has REALLY taken to Fable! Truly and honestly, I wish all students would do this so thoroughly! I often teach fable to older students, and they usually get more "creative" faster than the younger students, who may still be trying to get the basics of story retelling down (not forgetting important parts of the story, not changing the nature of the reversal, etc).
      However, from what you wrote, your daughter is doing very well. Quintilian said in his De Oratorio that he does not mind "excess" in the beginning, as it shows the strength of promise, whereas writing that is lacking in imagination and effusion is difficult to prompt into any kind of desirable development. (yes, that was definitely my paraphrase of him, but you get the idea!)

      Here are two basic guidelines I give my "creative, effusive" writers:
      1) Are the changes in character types, setting, and the development of the plot fitting to the nature of the original?
      2) Are the additions to the plot or the descriptions an asset, or a distraction to the story? In other words, does a galactic battle between the overlords of space ADD to my understanding of the Fox and the Grapes, or does it make me, the reader, forget what I'm reading for?
      Other than that, I tell my students to have about as much license to recreate the stories as they choose.
      I do have ONE caveat, and that is for the Narrative Parables from scripture, I ask then to be respectful of the Scripture from whence the stories come, and avoid adding fantastical and overly imaginary things to those stories. We treat them a bit more directly, retelling the story in our own words, yet keeping a tighter rein on additions and changes. Harry Potter has no place in "The King and the Two Servants," in my humble opinion.
      Other than those advisements, have FUN and enjoy these stages!
      Abigail Johnson

      Comment


        #4
        @enbateau Thank you for your reply! I appreciate hearing how others are doing this.
        Rose
        DD1 - 16 (11th grade, Great Books student + dual enrollment)
        DD2 - 10 (MP 4A)
        DS - 2 (MP Preschool)

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you, Abigail! Yes, she loves Fable and writing in general. I appreciate your feedback more than you know. These guidelines are exactly what I needed! I agree with your caveat for Scripture, and will use that, as well. We will keep moving forward with all of your advice in mind. Happy New Year's!

          Originally posted by Abigail Johnson View Post
          Hello! It sounds like your daughter has REALLY taken to Fable! Truly and honestly, I wish all students would do this so thoroughly! I often teach fable to older students, and they usually get more "creative" faster than the younger students, who may still be trying to get the basics of story retelling down (not forgetting important parts of the story, not changing the nature of the reversal, etc).
          However, from what you wrote, your daughter is doing very well. Quintilian said in his De Oratorio that he does not mind "excess" in the beginning, as it shows the strength of promise, whereas writing that is lacking in imagination and effusion is difficult to prompt into any kind of desirable development. (yes, that was definitely my paraphrase of him, but you get the idea!)

          Here are two basic guidelines I give my "creative, effusive" writers:
          1) Are the changes in character types, setting, and the development of the plot fitting to the nature of the original?
          2) Are the additions to the plot or the descriptions an asset, or a distraction to the story? In other words, does a galactic battle between the overlords of space ADD to my understanding of the Fox and the Grapes, or does it make me, the reader, forget what I'm reading for?
          Other than that, I tell my students to have about as much license to recreate the stories as they choose.
          I do have ONE caveat, and that is for the Narrative Parables from scripture, I ask then to be respectful of the Scripture from whence the stories come, and avoid adding fantastical and overly imaginary things to those stories. We treat them a bit more directly, retelling the story in our own words, yet keeping a tighter rein on additions and changes. Harry Potter has no place in "The King and the Two Servants," in my humble opinion.
          Other than those advisements, have FUN and enjoy these stages!
          Abigail Johnson
          Rose
          DD1 - 16 (11th grade, Great Books student + dual enrollment)
          DD2 - 10 (MP 4A)
          DS - 2 (MP Preschool)

          Comment

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