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    11th grade accelerated composition possible?

    Hello,
    Would greatly appreciate help with composition for 11th grader interested in starting CC. Is it even possible to cover it all by the end of 12th?
    If not, what would be most important to cover? A schedule would be great too!
    Thanks so much!

    #2
    Re: 11th grade accelerated composition possible?

    Hello.

    If you can complete Fable through Refutation/Confirmation Stages, that is really sufficient. And you could actually skip Fable with an 11th grader and start with Narrative. There aren't too many differences between those stages. So you could do a semester of Narrative and a semester of Chreia/Maxim in 11th grade. Then, for 12th grade, you could do Refutation/Confirmation, with the possibility of spending some time in Common Topic if you feel like Refutation/Confirmation is solid before the year is out. This would give your student great writing practice, while not pushing too hard to cover so many different concepts.

    Tanya

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      #3
      Re: 11th grade accelerated composition possible?

      Thanks so much for your reply!

      Which essay types are really necessary for College? Expository, persuasive, analytical, argumentative, research? Would the levels of CC you suggest teach these? Or, does CC teach the process differently? Is there a scope/sequence or list of what is covered?

      Thanks again!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: 11th grade accelerated composition possible?

        The Classical Composition program does cover most of those essay forms (expository, persuasive, analytical, argumentative) but not all in the progression Tanya laid out for you. It sounds like the best program for you might be IEW's High School Essay Intensive, which would provide the kind of general overview of and exposure to specific essay types that you are looking for in your time constraint. It also includes preparation for the types of essays you will encounter on the SAT and ACT. You could complete Narrative and Chreia/Maxim this year, and move on to Refutation/Confirmation next year, and then complete the IEW program at the end of 12th grade (The IEW HS Essay Intensive program is intended to be a seminar type of class, which can be completed anywhere from 6 days to 6 weeks).

        Classical Composition is a series of writing exercises that trains students to think logically, argue effectively, and employ vivid description in the pursuit of communicating with clarity and beauty. In short, it prepares students to enter the Rhetoric stage of learning.

        Here is a brief scope and sequence of the Memoria Press Classical Composition program:

        Fable: Introduces student to the process of communicating a main idea through writing. Students learn to employ figures of description and to recognize the components that make up a story.
        Narrative: Adds more depth to competencies taught in Fable. Develops the students understanding of the 9 components of narrative writing.
        Chreia/Maxim: Introduces the composition of a formal essay. Students are learning the skill of Invention, of coming up with their own stories rather than solely rewriting another author's idea (as in Fable and Narrative).
        Refutation/Confirmation: Students write an argumentative essay using several different methods of argumentation, and continue to build their proficiency with figures of speech and description. Students learn to argue for (Confirmation) and against (Refutation) the same story.
        Common Topic: Students learn to write a persuasive, expository essay in a mock trial, closing argument sort of format, using all previously learned figures of description and speech and methods of argumentation.
        Encomium/Invective/Comparison: A set of biographical Praise, Condemnation, and Comparison essays that hone the student's ability to highlight and exemplify virtue and vice. A research component may be added to this stage.
        Characterization: This essay is analytical in structure and emotive in content. It is a first-person pathetic characterization of a person, object, or concept.
        Description: A personal, descriptive exercise that focuses on developing a student's personal style and refining their use of the figures of description and speech in a natural, organic way.
        Thesis/Law: Students focus on argument arrangement in a point/counterpoint essay in which students set up a series of counterpoints to their argument and then knock them down one by one, utilizing the skills learned in the previous stages, but particularly in Refutation/Confirmation and Common Topic.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: 11th grade accelerated composition possible?

          Originally posted by dayna View Post
          The Classical Composition program does cover most of those essay forms (expository, persuasive, analytical, argumentative) but not all in the progression Tanya laid out for you. It sounds like the best program for you might be IEW's High School Essay Intensive, which would provide the kind of general overview of and exposure to specific essay types that you are looking for in your time constraint. It also includes preparation for the types of essays you will encounter on the SAT and ACT. You could complete Narrative and Chreia/Maxim this year, and move on to Refutation/Confirmation next year, and then complete the IEW program at the end of 12th grade (The IEW HS Essay Intensive program is intended to be a seminar type of class, which can be completed anywhere from 6 days to 6 weeks).

          Classical Composition is a series of writing exercises that trains students to think logically, argue effectively, and employ vivid description in the pursuit of communicating with clarity and beauty. In short, it prepares students to enter the Rhetoric stage of learning.

          Here is a brief scope and sequence of the Memoria Press Classical Composition program:

          Fable: Introduces student to the process of communicating a main idea through writing. Students learn to employ figures of description and to recognize the components that make up a story.
          Narrative: Adds more depth to competencies taught in Fable. Develops the students understanding of the 9 components of narrative writing.
          Chreia/Maxim: Introduces the composition of a formal essay. Students are learning the skill of Invention, of coming up with their own stories rather than solely rewriting another author's idea (as in Fable and Narrative).
          Refutation/Confirmation: Students write an argumentative essay using several different methods of argumentation, and continue to build their proficiency with figures of speech and description. Students learn to argue for (Confirmation) and against (Refutation) the same story.
          Common Topic: Students learn to write a persuasive, expository essay in a mock trial, closing argument sort of format, using all previously learned figures of description and speech and methods of argumentation.
          Encomium/Invective/Comparison: A set of biographical Praise, Condemnation, and Comparison essays that hone the student's ability to highlight and exemplify virtue and vice. A research component may be added to this stage.
          Characterization: This essay is analytical in structure and emotive in content. It is a first-person pathetic characterization of a person, object, or concept.
          Description: A personal, descriptive exercise that focuses on developing a student's personal style and refining their use of the figures of description and speech in a natural, organic way.
          Thesis/Law: Students focus on argument arrangement in a point/counterpoint essay in which students set up a series of counterpoints to their argument and then knock them down one by one, utilizing the skills learned in the previous stages, but particularly in Refutation/Confirmation and Common Topic.
          Thank you so much for this description of the levels of classical composition. My daughter takes the MPOA classes, but it is nice to have it laid out like this. Are any aspects of the HS essay intensive worked into the MPOA Foundations of modern composition class? Probably more a question for Mr. Piland. My daughter had quite a bit of trouble getting started on a literary analysis paper for her summer lit class and it sounds like the essay intensive might have helped with the format.
          Dorinda

          For 2020-2021
          DD 17-12th with MPOA(Classical Studies 3), CLRC (Latin 6, Greek 5), Thinkwell (Calculus and Chemistry), Vita Beata (Divine Comedy), American History
          DS 15-9th with Lukeion(Latin 1 and Greek 1), Vita Beata (9th Literature)
          DS 12-7th with Right Start Level H online class, Vita Beata (6th Literature)
          DS 6 - 2nd blazing our own trail with Right Start D and a mix of MP materials

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            #6
            Re: 11th grade accelerated composition possible?

            The MPOA Foundations for Composition class doesn't use the High School Essay Intensive course, but they do use IEW Student Writing Intensive Level C, and I think the instructor also pulls in some figures of description and other things from the Classical Composition courses. It doesn't strictly cover essay types though. MPOA also has an accelerated Classical Composition course that gets through Ref/Con in one year, which could also be a great option for those starting their writing course in High School.

            Our Upper School Literature Study Guides would probably be the best source for help with literary analysis papers. The guide walks them through the process of coming up with the Central One Idea of a work, and pulling out other themes, motifs, and concepts, and then gives essay options for these things. Though the structure of a lit paper is important (and certainly being able to come up with a thesis and defend it, which Classical Comp teaches!), it's also important that the student knows how to read a great work, which the Lit Guides teach.

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