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  • brett@memoriapress
    replied
    Re: Encomium

    Originally posted by corinnehook View Post
    "The prologue is composed of four sentences. The first sentence utilizes two heads
    of purpose in a compound-complex sentence to argue for encomiums. Apthonius uses
    first propriety or Honor and then Justice or consistency.
    It is right (Honor) to honor those who have made useful discoveries for
    the good things they have provided, and to refer what they have brought to light
    back justly (Justice) to those who disclosed it. "

    I understand what Aphthonius is doing here in the prologue, but what are all the available heads for developing the argument?

    Thanks for any help!
    Any of the heads of purpose can be used: clarity, consistency/justice, expediency, plausibility, possibility, propriety/honor. These are explained in the "Definition of Terms" pages at the beginning of the guide. Aphthonius uses honor and justice. When doing these with students, use these heads as "jumping off points" to help with the task of deciding what to say (called "invention" in the canons of rhetoric).

    Leave a comment:


  • corinnehook
    started a topic Encomium

    Encomium

    "The prologue is composed of four sentences. The first sentence utilizes two heads
    of purpose in a compound-complex sentence to argue for encomiums. Apthonius uses
    first propriety or Honor and then Justice or consistency.
    It is right (Honor) to honor those who have made useful discoveries for
    the good things they have provided, and to refer what they have brought to light
    back justly (Justice) to those who disclosed it. "

    I understand what Aphthonius is doing here in the prologue, but what are all the available heads for developing the argument?

    Thanks for any help!
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