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    Protagoras and Euthless

    We were discussing the dilemma and counter-dilemma the other day and using the examples of Protagoras and Euthless from the Traditional Logic II Dilemma chapter. After giving both examples, the question was raised, "well who won the case?"

    So, can you tell me, according to history or legend, which was more acceptable, the dilemma or the counter-dilemma?

    #2
    Which is more acceptable--Protagoras or Euthlus?

    Originally posted by SummitLogic
    We were discussing the dilemma and counter-dilemma the other day and using the examples of Protagoras and Euthless from the Traditional Logic II Dilemma chapter. After giving both examples, the question was raised, "well who won the case?"

    So, can you tell me, according to history or legend, which was more acceptable, the dilemma or the counter-dilemma?
    As far as I can tell, history does not indicate who "won".

    As to the question which was more acceptable, that question really cannot be answered, since the fact that two conclusions can be come to from the same set of facts is an indication that there is something inherently paradoxical in the premises.

    In other words, the problem was Protagoras's original agreement.

    Martin

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      #3
      Appreciation

      Martin,

      Thank you for clearing that up, and for the future I'll make sure to make that point to my students as well. That when both the dilemma and counter-dilemma seem to be acceptable then the original premise or agreement was flawed.

      Does the text say that and I've missed it over the past few years? If so, I apologize.

      By the way, I love the text and the hardwork that was obviously behind it.

      Comment


        #4
        Dilemmas

        Originally posted by SummitLogic
        Martin,

        Thank you for clearing that up, and for the future I'll make sure to make that point to my students as well. That when both the dilemma and counter-dilemma seem to be acceptable then the original premise or agreement was flawed.

        Does the text say that and I've missed it over the past few years? If so, I apologize.

        By the way, I love the text and the hardwork that was obviously behind it.
        Thank you. I didn't say this in the text. Maybe in some future revision I will. Dilemmas are very complex and could justify a whole book, so the treatment in my book is necessarily cursory.

        Martin

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