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My son is wanting to go into engineering so is this curriculum going to still work?

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    My son is wanting to go into engineering so is this curriculum going to still work?

    We need to spend quite a bit of time with his math and science in high school, he will need 4 years of each and science will probably take about an hour or more each day. I am worried about both the literature and classical studies as being too much of a load.

    #2
    Nancy Ann, I can't speak to MP's plans for their High School curriculum, but i did want to share my perspective?

    The short answer is to do what is best for your son, prioritizing according to his university level plans. And then, incorporate into your homeschool those portions of MP's Literature and Classical studies that you feel would best fit your son's time, talents, and needs.

    My two beans have artistic temperaments (all caps). My son is a musician, my daughter an artist. On the other hand, they both quite enjoy Maths and Science and both will complete a year of each in each of their Upper School years (ages 12-17) in our homeschool. Currently, they are studying Chemistry and Geometry.

    While they won't be studying the same load of Literature that I did in High School (I only took one year each of maths and science), I am confident that they will still cover a solid amount. (Currently they are studying The Aeneid).

    Homeschooling allows for such wonderful flexibility.
    homeschooling mother to a 16yo boy & 18yo girl, both learning at the high school level, and an adult son whom I homeschooled all the way through. You are welcome to read more about our homeschooling life at my blog: link via my username. Please forgive any typos in my comments here! I'm disabled and can't always type clearly.

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      #3
      This type of education is very important for engineers! College for them will be full of math, science, and business. But that doesn't teach one how to think of more importantly, why think. Business complain that engineers know their engineering but they don't know how to speak and write. An engineer who can think logically and communicate logically will have a head start on his peers.
      Yes, the math and science are important. But if he has an aptitude for engineering it should come pretty easily. Yes, he needs calculus and lab based chemistry and physics. Yes, he should master these. But for him these will be his fun classes. He still needs to really challenge his mind and the classics and Latin will do just that. Not only will this education benefit him in his job, but in life in general. We are more than our career.
      I'm a civil engineer (haven't earned a salary in over 20 years though). My husband is a mechanical engineer. My son is in engineering school (he went to public high for many reasons but laments not having a classical high school education like his sister and he is now studying philosophy on his own.).
      My husband is a professional witness and has to write legal reports and testify in court. He wishes he had formal training in logic.
      Yes, it is both doable and very worth while!
      Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
      DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
      DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
      DS, 21, chemistry major
      DS, 18, Physics major
      DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
      DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
      DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

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        #4
        This is all helpful, thanks so much.

        Can you all tell me about how many hours is to be expected for doing MP high school? If you can break it down by subject that would be helpful, but also just a number is good too!

        Thanks a bunch

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          #5
          Nancy Ann,

          I'm attaching a sample schedule for our upper school. That should give you a general idea of what we are doing and how much time is devoted to it.

          Regards,

          Tanya
          Attached Files

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            #6
            Tanya, maybe it is just me, but the file looks to be corrupted: clicking on it only brings up a page of gobbledygook.
            homeschooling mother to a 16yo boy & 18yo girl, both learning at the high school level, and an adult son whom I homeschooled all the way through. You are welcome to read more about our homeschooling life at my blog: link via my username. Please forgive any typos in my comments here! I'm disabled and can't always type clearly.

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              #7
              Tanya,

              Can you upload a pdf instead? Having a hard time opening the file. Thanks so much

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                #8
                Here in PDF form is what Tanya posted.

                Paul
                Attached Files
                Paul Schaeffer
                --
                Director, Schools Division
                Memoria Press

                Comment


                  #9
                  Okay, so it looks like 7 hours with 30 minute lunch break T-TH. Friday looks like less than 6 hours.

                  Is there home work Tuesdays through the weekend?

                  How many hours of work is expected on Monday?

                  How would this be adjusted to a home setting rather than a classroom?

                  Thanks for any help!

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                    #10
                    Hello.

                    Our upper school students do have homework during the week. It is generally reading assignments and math every night. It could also be studying for quizzes and tests. On Monday, they will generally work around 6 hours average. Of course, it varies from student to student. I think you could assume that it would take your students the same length of time to complete our curriculum as it takes our students in the classroom. But your students shouldn't have to do the homework at night. They should be able to get all assignments done within their school day. We don't have a lot of down time in our school day - no assemblies, no movies in the classroom, etc. It is a pretty rigorously academic day, so we get a lot done.

                    I hope this helps!

                    Tanya

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                      #11
                      Hi Nancy Ann, maybe a glimpse at our Homeschool Upper School days will give an idea of what this level of learning can look like at home? Every family is different, of course :-) But just to give you an idea ....

                      My two, ages 15 and almost 13, are learning at the same academic level for everything. They learn everything at home, with me directly teaching. So, no outside academic classes, or online classes. We've used *lots* of MP products in the past, this current term just the one, with others lined up to come (primarily Literature and Classical subjects -- I'd use more High School levels products if they were available now. Love MP).

                      Five days a week we are sitting down together for Lessons from 10 o'clock to about 4 o'clock. Once a week we wrap-up around two o'clock so as to take the 12yo out to piano and organ lessons. His daily music practice takes place outside of Lesson time.

                      Our general days with our current studies look like this, though of course some weeks or months end up being a little different, especially with the afternoon Lessons ...

                      • Geometry: 30minutes/day
                      • Chemistry: 30min (text and workbook only, I'll add in Lab when I can. Spring, probably).
                      • Latin -- AP Caesar: 30min
                      • Biblical Hebrew -- grammar year one; using a college-level text since I couldn't find a High School level: 30min
                      • Lunch + (silent) Reading (novels & for History research projects): 1 hour
                      • Biblical Greek -- translating the Gospel of Mark; this doubles as Bible Study: 45min
                      • Art History -- using the course from MP's Upper School
                      • Africa -- cultural-historical survey course
                      • US History 1880's-Present -- currently in the 20's/30's
                      • The Aeneid

                      Art History and Africa tend to be studied on alternate days, whereas everything else is daily, excepting of course on the music lesson day. All of the afternoon Lessons tend to be about 45minutes each. We are supplementing both Africa and Art History with DVD lectures from The great Courses. They run 30min each and on the days we watch them (which varies wildly!), we study the content covered during Lesson time, and then we watch the lectures together later in the day/evening.

                      Composition gets folded into the Cultural-Historical-Literature courses.

                      Presently, my kids don't do anything that would be construed as homework. However, there have been times in the past when I have assigned them twenty minutes or so of foreign language vocabulary review, to be completely daily before we begin morning Lessons.

                      If we were doing just one Language, that would free up an hour, except we're having so much fun with it all ... I wasn't **planning** on my kids becoming linguists?! One of the happy surprises homeschooling has given us. Calli wants to learn Russian, and Joshua had a dream the other night in which he procured Japanese grammars for us, and I'd like to teach them French ... So we'll see where we are at in a couple of years :-)

                      I hope this was helpful in terms of giving you an idea of what homeschooling High School can look like?
                      homeschooling mother to a 16yo boy & 18yo girl, both learning at the high school level, and an adult son whom I homeschooled all the way through. You are welcome to read more about our homeschooling life at my blog: link via my username. Please forgive any typos in my comments here! I'm disabled and can't always type clearly.

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                        #12
                        That is actually how it is playing out for my eighth grader...she is doing Henle Latin, Algebra I, the eighth grade literature, and the online physical science course....plus composition, religion, Christian studies...I think that is all...anyway, her day takes about what Tanya said, with occasional evening work if the morning ran long.

                        AMDG,
                        Sarah
                        2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                        DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                        DS, 16
                        DD, 14
                        DD, 12
                        DD, 10
                        DD, 7.5
                        DD, 5.5
                        +DS+
                        DS, 18 months

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                          #13
                          Thanks very much this is quite helpful!

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