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    What's next? Latin

    Hello- My family is getting started a bit late with Latin. We are doing Latina Christiana with our 8th, 6th, and 4th graders this year. I am wondering how to accelerate my eighth grader next year with the goal of getting through some Henle before he graduates? How far could I expect to get?

    Also, my sixth grader is taking to Latin much better than my fourth. Is there a way to let them go at their own pace? My fourth grader gets frustrated watching her older siblings speed through. I plan to put them all in First Form, but not group lessons like we are doing now.

    Thanks, Kristie

    #2
    Or would Henle I with an online class be better for my eighth grader? He is an independent learner but likes a audio/computer element when he is doing something on his own. I just don't want to overwhelm him!! Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    Kristie

    Comment


      #3
      Hi, Kristie.

      Your 4th grader probably needs to do First Form Latin just like we have scheduled it in our lesson plans - 1 lesson a week, really taking the time to master the vocabulary and grammar forms. It is perfectly normal that the 4th grader will have a more difficult time grasping the grammar, and that is purely developmental. She doesn't need to feel like she is competing with the older students.

      That makes me wonder if you wouldn't be better off putting your 6th and 8th graders into Henle online together. Then, the 4th grader can have First Form all to herself and not feel pressured to work at the same level as her siblings. And Henle online would be a good fit for your older students and move them through the Latin grammar at a more accelerated pace. Really, the 6th grader could go either way - with First Form or Henle, so I'd pair that student with whichever sibling he/she works best with. Either program is going to give your students the Latin grammar they need, so I think this comes down to which would be more conducive to peace and smooth sailing in your homeschool classroom!

      Cheers,

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        Kristie,

        I just wanted to lend some experiential support to Tanya's advice. We did my current fifth and seventh graders together in LC I two years ago, and the older did great, and the younger did too, but he was always irritated that it came easier for his older sister. I did First Form with them last year, and that was also frustrating, even though he does love Latin. So this year, they both went into Henle I....but they each go at the pace that is comfortable for them. Currently, she is about twenty lessons ahead of him....but he has no idea. The Forms series is a great, slower progression, which I plan to use going forward with my youngers....but Henle is wonderful too, and very doable for your older ones. (And we were not in the online classs....so that would be even more help).

        Hope that helps!
        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
        DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
        DS, 16, 11th
        DD, 14, 9th
        DD, 12, 7th
        DD, 10, 5th
        DD, 7.5, 2nd
        DD, 5.5, K/2nd mix
        +DS+
        DS, 18 months

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you, Tanya and Sarah for your responses.

          Tanya- I do plan to use First Form with my youngest, but I am concerned with the enrollment cost for two children in an online class. Is that the best option for high school? Please tell me if you think this years experience would help with his transition to Henle. The Forms seem much like what we are doing now.

          Sarah- I have read other comments of people who prefer the Forms because of the dvd/cd element. You are not finding the lack of that to be a problem? I would think pronunciation would be a concern.

          Thanks for your time.
          Kristie

          Comment


            #6
            Kristie,

            We did have the dvds for first form...and we loved them (they were borrowed...we too have to watch expenses) and they are very helpful for that foundation of pronunciation. After that, it did not seem that necessary. After all, our goal is not to have them be good Latin orators...but to read it and translate it.

            And they have been great in Henle even without the dvd element...we have the answer key, so they can correct their work...but that is all as far as extra help. They have even far outpaced me as I have too many younger schoolers to keep up with it. They both love Latin though, and I think it is because the gradual build up and stress free pace lets them see it without pressure, and gives them time to discover the awesomeness of Latin. The first year, we got a lot of questions about why study latin. Now they don't question it at all...and a favorite subject of both of them, despite very different personalities, too!

            AMDG,
            Sarah
            2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
            DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
            DS, 16, 11th
            DD, 14, 9th
            DD, 12, 7th
            DD, 10, 5th
            DD, 7.5, 2nd
            DD, 5.5, K/2nd mix
            +DS+
            DS, 18 months

            Comment


              #7
              Sarah, thank you for your help. I do feel like Henle would be the more mature fit for my son so your insight is helpful. Do you use the schedules others have mentioned they get elsewhere? I don't mind progressing at our own pace, but I would think you need to have some goal in mind to finish. Figuring out LC took me a month so I think it would be tough to figure out a new program. My kids have surpassed me too.

              I did notice the option for the independent study online. At least that would give my eldest the option to have someone to ask questions too. He has to understand everything, completely.

              My eldest daughter will be in 7th next year, but she is a young seventh. I have had to wait for her to catch up on some things, so I am concerned about Henle being to hard for her. Although, out of all of them, she is my child that has taken to Latin the most. She always knows the answers and remembers a ton. Do you have any thoughts on that? I would not be able to put them both in an online class. Or is there an option of doing the Forms and then moving on to the upper Henle's later in high school?

              Thanks, Kristie

              Comment


                #8
                Kristie,

                You can pay for your oldest student to take the online course, and the 6th grader could sit in the background and listen to the chats. That student just couldn't participate in the chat session. But you could sign the younger student up to do the independent study, and he/she would have access to the online quizzes and tests. This would keep your costs down and allow for both students to take advantage of a live teacher in a classroom.

                Tanya

                Comment


                  #9
                  Kristie,

                  Tanya's suggestion sounds like a great way to go if you can afford the class for your eldest. That way you have a built in confidence builder in that they have an instructor to set the tone and the pace for them.

                  For us, I drool over the online classes, but we just don't have it in the budget, so we have managed on our own. My eldest was going into seventh when she started Henle, and I have been pleasantly surprised at her enthusiasm for it. I think it has to do with how the lessons are presented in Henle, but also that it is in fact fun to get good at Latin!

                  We do not use any particular schedule for it, but we did set down goals for the year so that we would get through it all in high school. Actually, she has turned out to be going faster than that anyway. The lessons are set up in a way that make it difficult to say, do a lesson a day, or something like that. That is not to say it is difficult..it is not. A lesson is explained, exercises are given, and then translations using the lesson are given. These all vary in length given the topic of the lesson.

                  Instead, we use time spent on Latin as a daily guide. For my eldest it is 60 min, for my fifth grader it is 45. They may stop shorter than that if they know the next part will be too much for them. They have both gotten so used to the set up of the book that they know what they can mentally tackle in a day, especially given that Latin is not their only subject.

                  Personally I like the responsibilty and industriousness that this has created for them. It is very self-directed for them, and has developed a real sense of ownership. It is the same approach we use for music study as well....they both know it is expected, and that I keep track of their progress, but the amount of their progress is up to them. The more they put into it, the more they get out of it.

                  This has been my experience by putting them directly into Henle, an idea I got here on the forum. I do have a friend who has put her boys through the form series, using the dvds, and has had a similar success. And there is a smooth transition into Henle even while you are still finishing the Forms, if I'm remembering that right.

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah
                  2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                  DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                  DS, 16, 11th
                  DD, 14, 9th
                  DD, 12, 7th
                  DD, 10, 5th
                  DD, 7.5, 2nd
                  DD, 5.5, K/2nd mix
                  +DS+
                  DS, 18 months

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you, ladies!

                    Comment

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