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    Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

    I first posted this question in the K-8th grade board but since it is regarding logic, this board would probably have been a better choice. My apologies for the double post.

    Here is my question. Do the lesson plans for Traditional Logic 1 incorporate the supplemental texts?

    Thank you,
    Kelly

    #2
    I'll answer in both places!

    If you are talking about Socrates Meets Jesus and the Handbook of Christian Apologetics, our lesson plans don't include use of those books.

    Tanya

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

      Originally posted by tanya View Post
      I'll answer in both places!

      If you are talking about Socrates Meets Jesus and the Handbook of Christian Apologetics, our lesson plans don't include use of those books.

      Tanya
      Then are the supplements just supposed to be read straight through at any point in the Logic courses?

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

        We would recommend using them closer to the end of Traditional Logic I or the beginning of Logic II. The material in them is very clearly presented, almost in logical form. It is easy to pull syllogisms out of them to work with. The reason we offer them as supplements is as a real text on which the students can use their new-found skills of analysis.

        Paul
        Paul Schaeffer
        --
        Director, Schools Division
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

          Originally posted by pschaeffer View Post
          We would recommend using them closer to the end of Traditional Logic I or the beginning of Logic II. The material in them is very clearly presented, almost in logical form. It is easy to pull syllogisms out of them to work with. The reason we offer them as supplements is as a real text on which the students can use their new-found skills of analysis.

          Paul
          Thank you, Paul! So a plan of the following would work?
          1. Traditional Logic I
          2. Read Socrates & Jesus straight through
          3. Traditional Logic II
          4. Read Handbook of Christian Apologetics straight through



          I'm just wanting to make sure I have a clear plan. Thanks again!
          Angela

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

            That would work but I would rather suggest you use them as practice as you are going through the logic books instead of breaks. I was looking for an example and I found this answer from Martin Cothran:
            There are two basic things you can do that would make great enrichment exercises. The first is to take the simplest arguments in the Handbook of Apologetics and ask you students to 1) Test them for validity (you could even do this near the end of Logic I); 2) Tell which kind of valid argument form it is (as covered in ch. 2 of Logic II); and, if the argument is a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th figure argument, 3) Reduce it to the first figure.
            For example: On p. 58 of Kreet's Handbook, you find the Kalam Argument for the existence of God:
            1. Whatever begins to exist has a cause for its coming into being
            2. The universe began to exist
            3. Therefore, the universe has a cause for coming into being [God]

            Just have them put the qualifiers they know so it looks like what they have studied. Since "whatever" really means "all", you get

            1. All things that begin to exist have a cause for their coming into being
            2. The universe began to exist
            3. Therefore, the universe has a cause for its coming into being [God]

            This happens to be a BARBARA, so you don't need to reduce it, since it is already in the first figure.

            Again, this is an argument that has all the steps given to you in the book. It is also a simple categorical argument form. The next kind you could do would be the simple hypothetical arguments, like on p. 158.

            As you move on into more complex argument forms in Logic II, you could start first with the argument on p 61, for example. The one on p. 61 is a pretty easy complex argument. Others involve extrapolating the argument (bringing out any hidden premises or reordering them, which is taught in the last half of Logic II).

            The three exercises you want to practice with your student over and over again are 1) Putting vernacular arguments in logical form; 2) syllogism reduction (from Logic II, ch. 3 onward) and 3) backing in to a missing premise (from ch. 6 onward). I do it in every class. What you are doing with the supplementary materials is reinforcing these three skills.
            Paul Schaeffer
            --
            Director, Schools Division
            Memoria Press

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

              Would you recommend a schedule of the following?
              Day 1: dvd and day 1 wkbk
              Day 2: day 2 wkbk
              Day 3: day 3 wkbk
              Day 4: day 4 wkbk
              Day 5: quiz (do you recommend open note or closed note)?
              Thanks!
              Angela

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

                Angela,

                This sounds like a good plan to me. It's nice that the logic books are laid out by day, isn't it? It's a clear guide for you.

                You can do the quizzes either way. Our students at school take them as closed - no notes.

                Tanya
                Last edited by tanya; 08-21-2016, 08:20 AM.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Question about Traditional Logic 1 lesson plans

                  Originally posted by tanya View Post
                  Angela,

                  This sounds like a good plan to me. It's nice that the logic books are laid out by day, isn't it? It's a clear guide for you.

                  You can do the quizzes either way. Our students at school take them as closed - no notes.

                  Tanya
                  Thanks! That was very helpful. I appreciate the confirmation.

                  Comment

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