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    More City of God Questions

    If you and your children studied City of God at home, I'd be grateful to hear how you handled the following:

    1.) The definitions. Did you assign all of these in the workbook? How did your child know the Latin root? What resource did he use? I see that they are included on the quizzes.

    2.) Did your child complete the chapter questions in the workbook in addition to the summaries?

    3.) Did you assign any essays? If so, where did you get the suggestions for what to assign? (And how in the world do I grade that?)

    4.) How did you choose which portions to memorize?

    I saw Dr. Charlton's syllabus posted (thank you, tanya!) which was helpful with pacing, as well as Esther 's help. So I think I am okay with the pacing piece of this.

    I'm not sure I would take so much time in preparation with one course typically, as there are only so many hours in the day. However, my son lives and breathes philosophy and theology and will keep me on my toes with this class. I want it to be a memorable one for us both as we study it together his senior year. (sniff, sniff)

    Thank you for any ideas and suggestions you can offer.
    Lauren
    Mama to 5 Sweet Ones

    2021-2022:
    11th grade DS: Mix of MP materials, MPOA, and BJU
    9th grade DD: Mostly 9M, MPOA, and French
    7th grade DD: 7M
    5th Grade DD: 5M
    4.5 yo DS: Outside as much as possible beating on things with sticks; MP Jr. K and Mom made fun things

    #2
    Well, you haven't gotten any help here, and I'm sorry. I don't think many of our customers have made it to or through City of God yet. I do think you can treat this course like our other courses though and do a selected amount of work. This is a very difficult read, so the chapter summaries become quite important. We walk our students through these pages step by step, pointing out the major themes Augustine is putting forth. So I think that I would maybe use the study guide for that purpose, having your student answer the questions as he reads. That should help him to comprehend the material better. And honestly, if he does that and does a good job, I don't know that I would put a lot of emphasis on tests. I might even do them as open book as a way to revisit the material one more time. As for essays, that's totally up to you based on what other writing you are doing. There are some great themes to write essays on here though!

    I think it's great that you are going to do this course together. Having that discussion time will be so enriching for both of you! I wouldn't stress over it. Just know that this is one of - if not the - hardest books you will ask your student to read in high school, so consider it an introduction. Whatever he gets from it will be a win.

    Tanya

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by MamaHill View Post
      If you and your children studied City of God at home, I'd be grateful to hear how you handled the following:

      1.) The definitions. Did you assign all of these in the workbook? How did your child know the Latin root? What resource did he use? I see that they are included on the quizzes.

      2.) Did your child complete the chapter questions in the workbook in addition to the summaries?

      3.) Did you assign any essays? If so, where did you get the suggestions for what to assign? (And how in the world do I grade that?)

      4.) How did you choose which portions to memorize?

      I saw Dr. Charlton's syllabus posted (thank you, tanya!) which was helpful with pacing, as well as Esther 's help. So I think I am okay with the pacing piece of this.

      I'm not sure I would take so much time in preparation with one course typically, as there are only so many hours in the day. However, my son lives and breathes philosophy and theology and will keep me on my toes with this class. I want it to be a memorable one for us both as we study it together his senior year. (sniff, sniff)

      Thank you for any ideas and suggestions you can offer.
      Lauren
      My oldest did the course through MPOA and she did some summaries, but most certainly not all of them. I have been trying to read through City of God this year myself and it is very slow going. I tried early on to fill out the chapter summaries, but I tended to lose the flow when I did that. I will say I was usually reading at someone’s piano lesson or in the car which made it awkward to deal with a thick book and a thick study guide, neither of which wanted to stay open. I just made some notes in the book itself. It has been a worthwhile introduction even though I haven’t finished or gone through it perfectly. My next child is reading it this fall with Vita Beata so I hope to be able to discuss it with him a bit as well. I am sure you will have a great year!
      Dorinda

      Plans for 2022-2023
      16th year homeschooling, 13th year with Memoria Press
      DD College Sophomore
      DS 11th grade - Lukeion Latin and Greek, Vita Beata, MPOA Divine Comedy
      DS 9th grade - Vita Beata Literature/Classical Studies
      DS 4th grade - 4A with Right Start F, Second Form Latin, AAS 5

      Comment


        #4
        I have a question for whoever might have a thought about it. When I wrote up lesson plans for this class I thought it seemed like a good idea to run them concurrently. Like this: This is Friday the first week.


        So I am looking at Dr. Charlton's syllabus that Tanya posted in the other discussion over at "11 and 12 grade Lesson plans" and I see that these two chunks Cicero and Augustine are instead run sequentially. Is there a reason to do it that way besides that it is one class? Also I have my son signed up for the Vita Beata discussion and I am willing to bet that it is going sequentially as well. Which means I need to rewrite my stuff.

        On the other hand, if it is easier this way, that has merit. Although then he wouldn't be able to do the VB discussion group.

        Anyone have any thoughts?

        MP since 2011
        DS, 16, MP 11th grade
        DS, 14, MP 9th grade

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Esther View Post
          I have a question for whoever might have a thought about it. When I wrote up lesson plans for this class I thought it seemed like a good idea to run them concurrently. Like this: This is Friday the first week.


          So I am looking at Dr. Charlton's syllabus that Tanya posted in the other discussion over at "11 and 12 grade Lesson plans" and I see that these two chunks Cicero and Augustine are instead run sequentially. Is there a reason to do it that way besides that it is one class? Also I have my son signed up for the Vita Beata discussion and I am willing to bet that it is going sequentially as well. Which means I need to rewrite my stuff.

          On the other hand, if it is easier this way, that has merit. Although then he wouldn't be able to do the VB discussion group.

          Anyone have any thoughts?
          The MPOA class that my daughter took first covered the two Cicero texts and then City of God. The two moms moderating the VB discussion this year are splitting the workload so I doubt they would have both going simultaneously.
          Dorinda

          Plans for 2022-2023
          16th year homeschooling, 13th year with Memoria Press
          DD College Sophomore
          DS 11th grade - Lukeion Latin and Greek, Vita Beata, MPOA Divine Comedy
          DS 9th grade - Vita Beata Literature/Classical Studies
          DS 4th grade - 4A with Right Start F, Second Form Latin, AAS 5

          Comment


            #6
            Esther I think that there would need to be a good reason and a deliberate plan to schedule the two authors concurrently. For example, if you were going to treat major themes and compare/contrast how Cicero and Augustine dealt with these themes, e.g., the concept of just war, then perhaps concurrent readings from each could be scheduled. Or if you wanted to point out ways in which Augustine was influenced by Cicero's writing, you might do concurrent scheduling. Someone familiar with such themes could potentially create a good plan that would justify concurrent reading. (Of course, you can try concurrent reading when working one-on-one with a student.) But, for a class, I would say there is a risk of confusing students by going back and forth between the two writers, without a discernible, purposeful plan, and it would seem easier and more logical for students to read them sequentially. Just my thoughts.

            Bonnie

            Comment


              #7
              Dr. Charlton's syllabus was from the time when we did an entire year of City of God. Now, we do it like the MPOA class, spending part of the year on Cicero and part of it on Augustine. Have I posted that lesson plan for you? If not, I can do that tomorrow.

              Tanya

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by tanya View Post
                Dr. Charlton's syllabus was from the time when we did an entire year of City of God. Now, we do it like the MPOA class, spending part of the year on Cicero and part of it on Augustine. Have I posted that lesson plan for you? If not, I can do that tomorrow.

                Tanya
                you did - thank you!
                it was in the other forum thread on 11 and 12th grade lesson plans. I downloaded it right away- thank you. Wel it wasn’t so much lesson plans as the syllabus. How many weeks on each. If there is also a lesson plan would love to see it! I think I see what I need to do- get the consecutive plan put together.
                MP since 2011
                DS, 16, MP 11th grade
                DS, 14, MP 9th grade

                Comment

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