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    #16
    Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post

    How many Pi/Pas does her troop have? It's common for troops to lose older girls, but I think that having a big group of them generally helps change the mind of those thinking of leaving. I, too, am disappointed that my girl doesn't seem to have developed any special friendships within the AHG troop. And yet, she's determined to earn her Stars and Stripes award and she's always finding badges she'd like to work on, even though sometimes we both roll our eyes at some of the requirements. I think she enjoys organizing things for the younger girls and really loves service opportunities. Last year for her Lewis and Clark award (or whatever ends the Explorer years) she teamed up with another girl and they organized - within the troop - a collection of baby items for a crisis pregnancy center, inviting then the other girls to a party to make cards to encourage these mothers in hard situations. I think it made her feel like a grown-up, like she was doing her part. Things like this stretch my girl a bit, make her world wider, and help her grow up: you know this, of course, but your daughter may not, and it would be quite normal of course. She just wants to pursue her passion and can't see the big picture.
    It is quite the time commitment, even for me, since our troop is not very big and we're all asked to volunteer. If you have reservations about the time commitment, take them seriously, because no one is happy when stretched too thin. If not, I'd have some heart-to-heart conversations with her, see if you can convince her of all the good that staying in the troop would do to her and others.
    I'm thinking that her squad has about 9 or 10 PiPas.

    We've always talked about Stars and Stripes --- but many years ago, and as we've gotten closer, I hear a lot of sighing.

    Luckily --- we have a large troop --- it's one of the things I love about it. I've been in a smaller troop before, and it's ROUGH. This troop is incredibly well ran, super organized, etc. I do volunteer, but it's for things I can handle easily --- setting up Sign Up Genius for Court of Awards ceremony, cleaning up after COA, sitting on the Board of Review, etc. With the smaller troop, I felt like I was asked to volunteer monthly, and that was simply too much for me.

    I think time commitment was a poor choice of words --- I think ownership is a better one. It IS a time commitment for me, as I have a younger daughter who is also involved in AHG. I don't mind the time involved, but I feel like I'm the one who's pushing her to get it together and take ownership of this, which is frustrating me. I'm to the point of "Hey, you need to take over this, or we're finished, " even though I know the activity is fruitful.

    She's not one to make friends easily ---- I don't think she likes putting herself out there. (which is understandable)
    Plans for 2020-21

    Year 10 of homeschooling with MP

    DD1 - 25 - Small Business owner with a STOREFRONT
    DD2 - 14 - 9th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA - equestrian
    DS3 - 12 - 5A Cottage School - soccer
    DS4 - 12 - 5A Cottage School -soccer
    DD5 - 8 - 3A, Cottage School -equestrian and Irish dance
    DS6 - 6 - MP K - home with Momma

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      #17
      Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post

      And yet, she's determined to earn her Stars and Stripes award and she's always finding badges she'd like to work on, even though sometimes we both roll our eyes at some of the requirements. I think she enjoys organizing things for the younger girls and really loves service opportunities. s.
      I'm sorry to derail this conversation from the title thread, but I love reading posts that I don't quite need yet for little rabbit trails. I am the troop coordinator for our newly formed troop, stemming from another troop. We are anxiously awaiting the new girl handbooks hoping they don't sound as antiquated as they do now. I laugh at saying "antiquated" when we are pursuing a classical education though! For example, the Explorer physical fitness badge requirement to check your heart rate every 5 minutes is a bit excessive. We've also moved on from the food pyramid of the 80/90s........ I am learning a lot about the "spirit of the badge" and that making adjustments is OK! Does your troop (Dianna) have active girl mentors (I mean adults to mentor the girls)? We think this is key and are working hard on finding these individuals early on in our troop history. I hope she sticks with it, but I also understand if she already has another passion that might be something to consider.
      Christine

      (2019/2020)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
      DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

      Comment


        #18
        I love reading what other 9th grade parents are doing! I have my first 9th grader this year, and I'm feeling very nervous about navigating high school homeschool. We're planning to do basically everything at home. We don't have access to a cottage school or a classical co-op, and funds are too tight to do much outsourcing, although I'm considering trying out at least one MPOA class to help us out. Our plan isn't totally nailed down, but this is it so far:

        At home:
        - 9th grade literature (Poetry, Prose, and Drama, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Henry V) (He did Hound of the Baskervilles this summer with the free MPOA course and loved it!)
        - Henle II (I'm particularly nervous about this one at home, as I haven't kept up with his level of Latin. I have a good grasp of grammar, but I've fallen behind on vocabulary. Still considering MPOA for this)
        - Book of the Ancient Romans/The Aeneid (we have the DVDs for help)
        - Algebra II (Prentice Hall)
        - Classical Composition: Common Topic
        - Traditional Logic II (He did the self-paced free MPOA course for Logic I, but now I'm wishing I had done it along with him, so I'd understand Logic II! We do have the DVDs for this.)
        - Renaissance and Reformation Times
        - The Story of Christianity
        - Biology (still deciding which text - we have access to an Apologia text for free, so we'll likely use that)
        - First Form Greek

        At a local Christian school:
        - Band

        Other activities:
        - University children's choir
        - Trail Life (similar to AHG, to connect to that discussion 😉)
        - Considering either swim team or cross country
        - 4-H

        Wow, that at home stuff looks overwhelming now that I list it all out! (I have five younger children as well, four of whom I will be schooling). Is it crazy to do that much at home? My oldest and next oldest (rising 7th grader) do most of their work independently. I am a former high school English teacher, and my husband is a math/science teacher, so I feel like we're pretty well prepared for the harder subjects, although my husband doesn't have a lot of free time. Oddly enough, the subjects I'm considering for MPOA (besides Latin) are literature and composition. I feel ill-prepared for comp since I was progressively trained, but I think he's doing pretty well with it? With the humanities, I have a hard time leading discussions with him, and I feel like an MPOA class might help with that, but I don't know. We'll probably try to muster through 9th grade at home and see how it goes.

        I'm curious about this Foundations of Composition class I've seen mentioned in this thread. This is the first I've heard of it. How does it fit in with the progymnasmata in Classical Composition? Is it related or something different?

        - Pam



        Comment


          #19
          woolery81 I see our years are going to be very similar (though I'm having serious doubts about starting Greek now, time is very scarce...) and we're also a Trail Life family.

          If you need to add discussion to literature and classical studies, keep in mind the forum Vita Beata for families using MP - most of the discussion groups for next year are full, but you could try the waiting list, a spot may become available. We're trying it for the first time this year, and I'm hoping the children will enjoy it.

          As for Foundations of Composition, this is what I know. I know that I love the teacher, whom we met last year with the MPOA Grammar Summer Camp. I've heard this is an excellent, very helpful class. Originally it was organized thinking of students coming to MPOA without a Classical Composition background, hence the name. But it's not a "basics" class: I've heard you could take it with profit at the end of all the Classical Composition classes, but it can be very useful at any point after Refutation/Confirmation. For various reasons, we will likely not pursue Classical Composition beyond the Ref/Con stage, so I've placed my kids in Foundations for next year, and I hope it works well for them (I have two opposite writers, one needs to tame her writing fury, the other forgets he's supposed to put *all* he knows on paper, not just a part of it.) After that, our writing will come from literature, history, classical studies, and the senior thesis project. If you have more questions about this, there's always the Classical Composition forum.
          DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
          DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

          Comment


            #20
            Mrs Bee I did look into the Vita Beata forum, but unfortunately, the times for my oldest two students did not work out because they have band at those times, unless the band schedule changes. Maybe we can try next year!

            I'll have to look into the Foundations of Composition class. It sounds like it could be beneficial for my son! Maybe we'll see how Common Topic goes this year first.

            I've also wondered if Greek might be too much for us with our schedule, and it probably is, but we're going to try anyway. I took Greek in college and loved it. It's been a while, but I think it will come back to me, so I feel fairly confident in teaching it. I plan to teach my two oldest together, and my 2nd is very disciplined, so I'm hoping he'll keep us going. I figure we can just take it slowly and focus on the core subjects first.

            Comment


              #21
              Hello Pam,

              You have planned a very full program for a 9th grade student, particularly considering his extracurricular activities: band, choir, swim/running, Trail Life, and 4-H. That is quite a lot! All your selections are good, but you may want to pare back. An earlier motto for Memoria Press was multum non multa (much, not many). It's important to have time in high school to go deep, to work throughly, and make connections. Algebra2 is more difficult than algebra1, and most students need to put in more effort to master it. Apologia Biology is easier than Holt or Novare biology, but you have quite a few classes on his plate. Some students thrive with a heavy workload, but other students can be overwhelmed and take shortcuts. You are the best judge of your son's capabilities.

              If you decide to pare back, I suggest Renaissance and Reformation Times should be the first to go. He can do that another year.
              I might drop the Greek, but you express your desire to tackle it. Does he really want to study Greek? It is great, but definitely an "extra".
              It's good you will be mostly at home, because he will have a full day of work! If you can outsource one class, Henle II would be a great choice. Composition is also a good choice, so that he receive feedback from an "impartial" source. (It can be more difficult to receive composition feedback/correction from a close family member.)
              I would only add in swim team or cross-country if he really benefits from that extra activity. He can run for fitness, without running cross-country.

              That's my unsolicited advice. Your mileage may vary!
              Best wishes as you navigate the high school path with your eldest.
              Cindy Davis
              Science and Math teacher at Highlands Latin School - Indianapolis
              ds-26 college graduate: independent young adult
              ds-24 college graduate: 3rd year med school
              dd-22 college graduate: working as a registered nurse

              Comment


                #22
                woolery81 As an additional suggestion, I wanted to say that we've started using summer as the perfect time for some things that we couldn't fit during the year, especially things that can be discussed and don't require exercises, like literature. This summer dad is working from home but has a lot of free time, so he's leading three family projects: As You Like It (done!), Nature's Beautiful Order and Early Sacred Music. They feel more like family activities than school, something we find easy to discuss even at the dinner table.
                Looking at 9th grade, with a giant like the Aeneid and a composition class, I fell like we don't really need the full 9th grade literature package for credit purposes, so what will likely happen is that the part of the package I have in mind will be pushed to the summer. You look very much in the same situation (Aeneid + composition class), so keep in mind that, if you get to the point where you feel there's too much going on, you can always cut some literature, or push it to the summer... or leave it as simple pleasure reading.
                DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by bean View Post
                  Here's last year 9th grade thread- some good thoughts there. I know our year went a little differently than planned. https://forum.memoriapress.com/forum...th-grade-plans
                  I started that thread last year and my year went differently than planned, too. I learned I planned too much and had to drop a couple things.
                  DS, 15, 10th grade
                  DS, 12, 7th grade

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Sugarbelle View Post

                    I started that thread last year and my year went differently than planned, too. I learned I planned too much and had to drop a couple things.
                    The story of my life...
                    DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                    DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Cindy in Indy , thank you so much for your response! This thread has caused me to stop and reevaluate our plan for the coming year. I felt like we were just following the MP core package plan, with the exception of Greek, but when I wrote it all out there, it did look like too much. (But as a side note, since this basically is the core curriculum, why does MP say it follows the principle of multum non multa if this seems like so much?)

                      My son is a very bright student, but not necessarily the most diligent, especially with the distraction of five siblings. I think I will take a look at our plan and pare it down. I know I could cut the Renaissance and Reformation Times program, but he is a major history nerd, which is why I left it in, simply because I thought he would enjoy it (he's actually already started and does enjoy it). It's one that's easy for him to just do on his own (he calls it one of his "fun" subjects), although it does detract from him doing work that I would consider more important. We have been continuing on with school on a light schedule this summer. I'm thinking maybe I'll see if he can finish The Story of Christianity and Renaissance and Reformation this summer, so that would be two less things to fit in during the year (he had been following the accelerated schedule before dropping to 8M this past year, which is why he already started some of the 9th grade lessons. He's been a mix of 7A, 8A, and 8M this past year!).

                      I think I will also consider putting Greek on hold. Perhaps that's something we could look at doing as a summer course. What do you think of cutting back the literature selections? He has always struggled to get in all the literature in a year, and I do think we've had trouble with discussion and delving deeply into literature. We had a lot of trouble with the Poetry and Short Stories book in 8M, in particular, but I also think it's important to be exposed to Poetry, so I don't think we should drop Poetry, Prose, and Drama. I may just choose selections from Poetry, Prose, and Drama instead of completing the whole book. I'm considering dropping Sir Gawain as a "subject" and just have him read it on his own for fun, so we would focus on the other literature selections and give us more flexibility in the schedule.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post
                        woolery81
                        Looking at 9th grade, with a giant like the Aeneid and a composition class, I fell like we don't really need the full 9th grade literature package for credit purposes, so what will likely happen is that the part of the package I have in mind will be pushed to the summer. You look very much in the same situation (Aeneid + composition class), so keep in mind that, if you get to the point where you feel there's too much going on, you can always cut some literature, or push it to the summer... or leave it as simple pleasure reading.
                        Thank you for the idea! I think we will cut back on literature some. Do you adjust composition at all for this? I failed to give composition assignments with The Iliad/Odyssey (except for the essay on the test) or with literature, and I think I need to add in more writing assignments there. But then do you cut back on Classical Composition to accommodate? My son does not enjoy writing, so I tend to give him the bare minimum. It's like pulling teeth to get him to complete an additional writing assignment. But at the high school level, I think I need to push him to write more.

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                          #27
                          woolery81 My kids did Homer through MPOA, but besides the comprehension questions (which I required they do in writing, full sentences, unless they consisted of a date or a name) and the exams, I don't think there was any other composition involved. I did find that I ended up not cutting back on Refutation/Confirmation, but definitely slowing it down, and that's why we have I think 3 lessons still to complete before September. I still need to look into what the Aeneid requires.
                          My son doesn't enjoy writing either, but it doesn't make any difference. My daughter doesn't enjoy math, and it doesn't make any difference either Quizzes and tests check knowledge, so I see their writing assignments, no matter the subject, mainly as exercises in logical thinking and clear expression of ideas. To be able to make a sound argument out of the notions one has learned is a great skill to develop, so that's why I say it doesn't make any difference whether he considers writing a favorite or not. There are definitely areas where I'm a total softie and cave (like with his picky eating), but not writing! Kids tend to have a narrow utilitarian view of the things they don't enjoy; they think they're going to live very well without them, thank you. Most of us were like that at 14-15! So make sure your expectations are reasonable, and remind your son that he's building his character - he's not going to thank you now, but be patient
                          DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                          DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Mrs Bee I'm glad to hear MPOA doesn't assign any additional writing with Homer. He did fully answer all the comprehension questions, just not essays. I definitely don't cut back on Classical Composition, but in subjects where there are additional (optional) essays, like literature and Classical Studies, I have not been assigning any additional assignments. I do make him complete essays on final tests. Do you complete the entire Classical Composition book, or do you only complete what is assigned in the Core Curriculum manual? I think my son did a great job with Ref/Con, but we only did the lessons assigned in the manual, which stopped at 10.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              woolery81 I don't use a specific Core, so I don't have a curriculum manual. I didn't even know the manual does not cover the whole book! Being happy with how he did is exactly the result you should be looking for. If you also liked his exam essays, I'd say that's wonderful. Keep at it, while pushing him a bit - you never know. My son has been taking piano lessons, like his sister. She's a natural at it and has always had the time of her life with the lessons. He was compliant, but doing the bare minimum. We had to remind him to practice, and we had to endure his dragging his feet. We seriously thought of stopping lessons for him. And then, out of the blue, he totally bloomed. He happened to master a piece he was working on, and the experience for some reason sparked something wonderful in him. He thoroughly enjoys piano playing now, even though he'll never be as good as his sister (though he loves doing duets with her... while bickering the whole time!)
                              I think writing abilities may well follow a similar process in many students - especially boys, from the anecdotes I hear: a lot of cajoling and coaching and pushing, a lot of patience and perseverance required, and then you may well see something beautiful happen.
                              DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                              DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by howiecram View Post

                                I'm sorry to derail this conversation from the title thread, but I love reading posts that I don't quite need yet for little rabbit trails. I am the troop coordinator for our newly formed troop, stemming from another troop. We are anxiously awaiting the new girl handbooks hoping they don't sound as antiquated as they do now. I laugh at saying "antiquated" when we are pursuing a classical education though! For example, the Explorer physical fitness badge requirement to check your heart rate every 5 minutes is a bit excessive. We've also moved on from the food pyramid of the 80/90s........ I am learning a lot about the "spirit of the badge" and that making adjustments is OK! Does your troop (Dianna) have active girl mentors (I mean adults to mentor the girls)? We think this is key and are working hard on finding these individuals early on in our troop history. I hope she sticks with it, but I also understand if she already has another passion that might be something to consider.
                                I'm sorry, howiecram --- I didn't come back and answer this.

                                Her squad has an AMAZING leader, who was the troop coordinator for a number of years as well, so I have excellent support. And yes --- we are all about the 'spirit of the badge'. I mean, honestly, Rachel has taught most of the Horsemanship badge to campers, lesson riders, and even me!

                                I feel like the passion could be blended quite well with AHG --- it's just getting the 'buy in' from her. She's not always willing to go out of her comfort zone. But, as a mom, I'm not one to sit back and accept mediocrity, if that makes sense. I'm a pusher. If you have a talent, an ability, and resources, then why not soar with that?
                                Plans for 2020-21

                                Year 10 of homeschooling with MP

                                DD1 - 25 - Small Business owner with a STOREFRONT
                                DD2 - 14 - 9th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA - equestrian
                                DS3 - 12 - 5A Cottage School - soccer
                                DS4 - 12 - 5A Cottage School -soccer
                                DD5 - 8 - 3A, Cottage School -equestrian and Irish dance
                                DS6 - 6 - MP K - home with Momma

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