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    Latin slogan help

    How would you translate the phrase "Execute with Excellence?"
    Thank you for your help!
    Kristin
    Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
    DD18; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
    DD16; Junior

    #2
    Kristin,

    For execute, you could use the imperative of exsequor, execute, follow to the end, follow steadfastly. This would be Exsequere for the singular or Exsequimini for the plural. Then, with excellence could be expressed by the ablative, cum excellentia. So if you want to use the plural imperative: Exsequimini cum excellentia.

    Bonnie

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
      Kristin,

      For execute, you could use the imperative of exsequor, execute, follow to the end, follow steadfastly. This would be Exsequere for the singular or Exsequimini for the plural. Then, with excellence could be expressed by the ablative, cum excellentia. So if you want to use the plural imperative: Exsequimini cum excellentia.

      Bonnie
      Thank you! My boss will be happy with that as our IT slogan. He knew I had done some Latin with my kids, so he asked me. I was afraid I would end up claiming that our IT department is exemplary executioners if I tried it myself! And while sometimes our help desk might occasionally want to strangle folks, it probably isn't something we should put on a slogan. Thanks again!
      Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
      DD18; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
      DD16; Junior

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
        Kristin,

        For execute, you could use the imperative of exsequor, execute, follow to the end, follow steadfastly. This would be Exsequere for the singular or Exsequimini for the plural. Then, with excellence could be expressed by the ablative, cum excellentia. So if you want to use the plural imperative: Exsequimini cum excellentia.

        Bonnie
        Bonnie, just curious here: would you find ago, agere (or even facio) too generic in this context? And if you wanted to translate "with excellence" with an adverb, which one would you choose? Just questions for your spare time
        DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
        DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

        Comment


          #5
          Mrs. Bee,

          Ago did pop through my mind. But you are right that it is more generic, while exsequor is the actual source of the English execute (from the 4th principal part exsecutus). So exsequor seems more direct and precise. It has more the connotation of following through to the end. And, yes there is an adverb excellenter, excellently, eminently. I always like to translate the Latin back to English to see whether the desired effect is achieved. If you saw Agite excellenter, you might read it as Drive excellently, Do excellently. But if you see Exsequimini cum Excellentia, you are very likely to express it as Execute with Excellence.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
            Mrs. Bee,

            Ago did pop through my mind. But you are right that it is more generic, while exsequor is the actual source of the English execute (from the 4th principal part exsecutus). So exsequor seems more direct and precise. It has more the connotation of following through to the end. And, yes there is an adverb excellenter, excellently, eminently. I always like to translate the Latin back to English to see whether the desired effect is achieved. If you saw Agite excellenter, you might read it as Drive excellently, Do excellently. But if you see Exsequimini cum Excellentia, you are very likely to express it as Execute with Excellence.
            Thank you, Bonnie, this is fun! If I can bother you once more - with many apologies to klwalukas for using her request to ponder these things - would it be wrong to use a hortatory subjunctive instead of an imperative, to make it sound less like a stern order, and more like an invitation?
            DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
            DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

            Comment


              #7
              klwalukas I think your post is going to inspire a lot of MP families to make up their own Latin family motto... at least those who haven't done so already
              DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
              DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

              Comment


                #8
                Mrs. Bee,

                Absolutely, you could use a first person plural hortatory subjunctive to express encouragement or resolve. Exsequamur cum excellentia. Let us execute with excellence.

                As you suggest, it has a milder, more encouraging tone. Also, this form of the deponent might be more recognizable to English speakers and easier to translate than the deponent imperative – and, with one less syllable, probably a little easier to pronounce.

                Bonnie








                Comment


                  #9
                  Just trolling and learning over here...
                  Festina lentē,
                  Jessica P

                  2020-2021
                  11th year HSing · 9th year MP
                  @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
                  11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

                  Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you so much, Bonnie , it's been very helpful to talk through this translation process. I don't know how many times I've told my kids not to rush with their translations, even when the vocabulary is obvious to them - we should remember there are all sorts of decisions lurking in the background, like using a simple vs. a progressive tense. I did hate this kind of advice when I was in school!
                    DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                    DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Yes, Mrs. Bee, (and I should have not rushed my English -- I meant one fewer syllable, not one less syllable -- hang head in shame), your point is well taken about decisions in the background. I think the scope, as well as the beauty, of those choices becomes clearer for students when they begin to read a master of the language like Caesar.

                      Bonnie

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Bonnie,

                        I love your love of Caesar!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          And this is why I am a math and science nerd. Sigh. I know Latin is worth learning and I can rock FF and SF and I can even handle the basics of grammar in TF and 4F. Then my mind just turns to mush and I start daydreaming about teaching calculus instead.
                          Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
                          DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
                          DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
                          DS, 21, chemistry major
                          DS, 18, Physics major
                          DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
                          DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
                          DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            momgineer One of my high school teachers always told us that Latin and math (and I think she said music too) have a lot in common. Of course we rolled our eyes back then. But I do see that there is truth to that - Latin is wonderfully logical, and a translation is not unlike doing a geometry proof or solving a math problem (or a murder - I tell my kids to imagine they're detectives, they have all sorts of clues and they must not pin the murder on the wrong person!)
                            DS (14) and DD (13): MPOA and MP, mostly 8th grade
                            DS (6): a mix of K resources, MP and not

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post
                              momgineer One of my high school teachers always told us that Latin and math (and I think she said music too) have a lot in common. Of course we rolled our eyes back then. But I do see that there is truth to that - Latin is wonderfully logical, and a translation is not unlike doing a geometry proof or solving a math problem (or a murder - I tell my kids to imagine they're detectives, they have all sorts of clues and they must not pin the murder on the wrong person!)
                              I love the logic of Latin! It’s because of that that Latin is the core to our curriculum. I will say, though, that numbers are numbers and theorems are theorems. They don’t change their meaning depending on context. They don’t have nuances and connotations. Words on the other hand! Ugh! I completely admire those who have mastered more than just their native language. After four years I high school German, I couldn’t even carry on a very basic conversation with a German.
                              Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
                              DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
                              DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
                              DS, 21, chemistry major
                              DS, 18, Physics major
                              DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
                              DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
                              DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

                              Comment

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