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    High School Help

    We have been homeschooling our daughters for the past three years, and our oldest is currently in 8th grade. This year, she is taking Algebra and Composition through MPOA and I do the rest of the coursework with her. Our issue this year has been that most days she is done with her work by 12:00 or 1:00. She probably consistently works about 3 1/2 - 4 hours per day, and this is with me assigning extra essays or Geography Honors work. Since she is done early and most of her friends are still in school, she has decided that she wants to go to high school next year. I see that she needs more social interaction, and I'm trying to have more friends over on the weekend, but during the week she feels isolated. I really don't want to give up Memoria Press - I love the scope and sequence through the high school years, and the extra time it gives our family. If she does 5 courses with MPOA in 9th grade, will her work load be pretty full? Do any of you have experience with kids wanting to go to high school? Any ideas about how to enrich what we're already doing? I thought about having her learn calligraphy or another hobby in the afternoon, but that seems to have fallen flat.

    Thanks!

    Maran Grace
    Atlanta, GA

    Maran Grace

    DD12 Grade 8
    DD7 Grade 3
    DD3 Jr. Kindergarten

    Peachtree Corners, GA

    #2
    Maran,
    Can you share exactly what she's doing this year course-wise? Is she sill doing Latin? Do you know what you plan to have her study in full next year?

    The first thing that comes to mind is this--is there a business she wants to start? Maybe hand-lettering, crocheting critters (my daughter sells these), wood carving or burning, cake decorating? It's not too early for her to consider an ETSY shop or selling locally through Facebook Marketplace. Mother's helper is also something that might be worthwhile if you have local connections. I am thinking in particular for other homeschooling families who have lots of littles!
    Does she have any activities (sports, music, etc.) that take up a lot of time in the afternoons/evenings? If yes, then that empty afternoon may be a good time to relax and rest.

    Just some ideas to get the conversation started.
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    10th year HSing · 8th year MP
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    10th, 8th, 5th, 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      I have no advice to offer since my oldest is in 7th, but I can relate to the isolation. My son really, REALLY wants and expects to go to High School. However, after seeing the beauty of MP and the direction we're going (for ex. studying Latin to someday translate), it would kind of break my heart to send him. He feels isolated too and is a total extrovert. I imagine this is something that many parents have to deal with and I look forward to hearing some advice!

      Comment


        #4
        This year her coursework is Third Form Latin, Geography II, Classical Studies ! (Book of Ancient Greeks, Iliad, and Odyssey), Confirmation and Refutation online, Algebra I online, 8th grade Literature, and Grammar III, and Exploring Planet Earth.
        Next year, she would study Fourth Form Latin, Algebra II, Classical Studies II, Biology, High School Composition II, Logic, Medieval Literature, and US History.

        I've thought also about babysitting, dog walking, and I love the idea of an Esty Shop - that could be a good way to sell art. She does take an art class, piano, and tennis. I think part of her frustration is that she would like to have a group of people that she interacts with and sees on a daily basis, as opposed to doing online classes. She has recently hit that age where her peers are becoming more important. I've looked at home school co-ops, but we would have to sacrifice Memoria Press curriculum, and that's a sacrifice I don't think I'm willing to make. We love it too much!

        Thanks for your insight.
        Maran Grace

        DD12 Grade 8
        DD7 Grade 3
        DD3 Jr. Kindergarten

        Peachtree Corners, GA

        Comment


          #5
          I don't mean to derail your thread, Maran Grace. But can you please tell me your secret? My son is taking a similar course load, and I would LOVE to be finished that early.
          Do you do everything that is assigned? Do you skip parts? Do others find this time estimate to be typical?

          You see, we have the exact opposite problem. My 7th grade son is taking a similar course load (with a few equal substitutions), and his school day typically runs from 8AM-5PM most days! (With an hour lunch.) He does spend a lot of time on math each day, but even if I didn't count math, he wouldn't be done until 3PM. I've been looking for ways to shorten his day without sacrificing the integrity of the curriculum. My friend tells me that this is just how long the upper grades take. Is she wrong?


          Just to give you an idea of how long each subject takes us....
          Latin takes us an hour each day. And we are only doing Second Form Latin. (We do flashcards, grammar review, recitation, spelling practice, workbook, and check.)
          Literature + Poetry take an hour each day. (Go over vocabulary words/reading notes, check comprehension questions/enrichment (assigned independently), read new chapter together, have discussion.)
          Novare physical science takes us an hour each day (Read Chapter, Complete Learning check and then go over together and make improvements to answers, make flashcards or complete a review)
          Grammar/Spelling/Composition take us about 2 hours per day
          We schedule an hour a day to rotate through Christian Studies/Geography II/Geography I review/Timeline Composition work
          FMMA/FMOG takes us about 30 mins per day, etc, etc., etc. etc.

          Do you complete all of the tests? Maybe it just takes my kids a bit longer to master the material than most? I don't know.

          To answer your question about socialization, I have found that I often have to make my own opportunities in that area. I started a group on meetup.com for homeschoolers. We meet for boardgames, trips to the zoo, field trips, nature walks, park days, tea, Shakespeare club, etc. etc. All of those things are just extras---but the true benefit to the group has been that all of my children have a close group of friends which I think is important. We started the group when my oldest was 4, and now my oldest is 13. So my kids have sort of grown up with these kids. So my advice: if you want something, don't be afraid to chase after it! Typically, if you are feeling a need for something, I bet there are others in your community who are too!
          Last edited by TheAttachedMama; 01-13-2020, 06:00 AM.
          Cathy aka The Attached Mama
          2019-2020
          DS 12, 7th Grade
          DD 11, 6th Grade
          DS 5, K

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by TheAttachedMama View Post
            I don't mean to derail your thread, Maran Grace. But can you please tell me your secret? My son is taking a similar course load, and I would LOVE to be finished that early.
            Do you do everything that is assigned? Do you skip parts? Do others find this time estimate to be typical?

            You see, we have the exact opposite problem. My 7th grade son is taking a similar course load (with a few equal substitutions), and his school day typically runs from 8AM-5PM most days! (With an hour lunch.) He does spend a lot of time on math each day, but even if I didn't count math, he wouldn't be done until 3PM. I've been looking for ways to shorten his day without sacrificing the integrity of the curriculum. My friend tells me that this is just how long the upper grades take. Is she wrong?


            Just to give you an idea of how long each subject takes us....
            Latin takes us an hour each day. And we are only doing Second Form Latin. (We do flashcards, grammar review, recitation, spelling practice, workbook, and check.)
            Literature + Poetry take an hour each day. (Go over vocabulary words/reading notes, check comprehension questions/enrichment (assigned independently), read new chapter together, have discussion.)
            Novare physical science takes us an hour each day (Read Chapter, Complete Learning check and then go over together and make improvements to answers, make flashcards or complete a review)
            Grammar/Spelling/Composition take us about 2 hours per day
            We schedule an hour a day to rotate through Christian Studies/Geography II/Geography I review/Timeline Composition work
            FMMA/FMOG takes us about 30 mins per day, etc, etc., etc. etc.

            Do you complete all of the tests? Maybe it just takes my kids a bit longer to master the material than most? I don't know.
            It sounds like you're working one-on-one with your 7th grader. That is a great thing if you can do it, but it will always take longer. A couple of possibilities for keeping the goodness, but streamlining your days:

            1. For a child who works well on their own: have a "Lesson Day" once a week where you review/discuss last week's assignments and prepare (reading notes, vocab, etc) for the current week. They then work independently during the week, asking questions as needed. You just review their written Latin and Math work daily.

            2. For a child that isn't ready for that much independence (like mine!): have a Daily Meeting where you go over 2-3 subjects, addressing their most challenging subject daily and then rotating through their other subjects. For example, my 7th grader and I have started meeting daily for Latin and then we add one or two other subjects to that each day. When we do this, we review/discuss the last set of assignments for that subject and prep for the next set of assignments. If there's a subject that I know will fall through the cracks, I can rotate that twice a week instead of once. Since we're meeting daily, I can also review his planner to make sure he's still hitting the other subjects we've already met about.

            Would something like that help?

            Jennifer
            Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

            DS16
            MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
            MPOA: High School Comp. II
            HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

            DS15
            MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
            MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
            HSC: Modern European History

            DS12
            7M with:
            Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

            DS11
            SC Level 4

            DD9
            3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

            DD7/8
            Still in SC Level 2

            DD 4/5
            SC Level C

            Comment


              #7
              Cathy,

              No derailment at all - part of the reason I posted was to see if I was skipping important parts. So I appreciate your breaking down your day and the time it takes to accomplish each subject. I will add the caveat that I sometimes have her redo assignments or add to them because she sped through something and didn't write a complete answer or didn't do her best. She is very much like my husband, and they both love to tackle a list. Every morning she will grab her agenda and get to work. While I'm working with my younger 2 children, she'll do the things that she can do independently, and then when I can get a break, we'll review, discuss literature, go through grammar questions and assignments.

              There is no spelling or timeline to complete in 8th grade. She takes her Algebra class with MPOA on Monday and Wednesday, and then she completes the work independently, unless she needs my help.
              Another change this year is with composition. The past two years, when I taught it, we had a lesson each day. Now that she does it online, they complete most of the writing in class (meets one day a week) and then she takes a couple of days to add figures of description and edit her work before turning it in.
              We do complete all of the tests. I don't assign all of the enrichment activities, but I do a good number of them. After looking at your day, I'm questioning our science time. We're doing Planet Earth, and it's in the curriculum only one day a week. Is yours in the curriculum each day or do you go back and review it each day? Finally she does much of her reading independently. If she's struggling with comprehension, then we'll go back and read it together, but she seems to be strong in reading comprehension and has a natural ability to memorize quickly.

              My middle daughter is another story. Her day is longer, partly because we read everything together, and partly because she get easily distracted.

              We joined a homeschool group last year that provided field trips and enrichment days once a month. I was hoping that my youngest two would find a group of girls that they would see on a regular basis. The funny thing is that both of their age groups had mostly boys, and although they're happy to play with either, it wasn't a long term solution for finding their core friend group. I need the encouragement of continuing to pursue those things that we desire for our kids because there are probably others who are searching for the same thing.



              Maran Grace

              DD12 Grade 8
              DD7 Grade 3
              DD3 Jr. Kindergarten

              Peachtree Corners, GA

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jen1134 View Post

                It sounds like you're working one-on-one with your 7th grader. That is a great thing if you can do it, but it will always take longer. A couple of possibilities for keeping the goodness, but streamlining your days:

                1. For a child who works well on their own: have a "Lesson Day" once a week where you review/discuss last week's assignments and prepare (reading notes, vocab, etc) for the current week. They then work independently during the week, asking questions as needed. You just review their written Latin and Math work daily.

                2. For a child that isn't ready for that much independence (like mine!): have a Daily Meeting where you go over 2-3 subjects, addressing their most challenging subject daily and then rotating through their other subjects. For example, my 7th grader and I have started meeting daily for Latin and then we add one or two other subjects to that each day. When we do this, we review/discuss the last set of assignments for that subject and prep for the next set of assignments. If there's a subject that I know will fall through the cracks, I can rotate that twice a week instead of once. Since we're meeting daily, I can also review his planner to make sure he's still hitting the other subjects we've already met about.

                Would something like that help?
                No, I don't work one-on-one with him. I would love to because I want to read and learn about these things too. However, there simply isn't enough time in the day to do this with all of the other plates I find myself spinning on a daily basis. I do Novare Physical science with him. (Only because I can't grade the quizzes or learning checks if I don't read the chapter too using the answer key alone.). MPOA teaches Latin and classical studies. And the rest of the things I assign and check.
                Cathy aka The Attached Mama
                2019-2020
                DS 12, 7th Grade
                DD 11, 6th Grade
                DS 5, K

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mgrace View Post
                  Cathy,
                  After looking at your day, I'm questioning our science time. We're doing Planet Earth, and it's in the curriculum only one day a week. Is yours in the curriculum each day or do you go back and review it each day? Finally she does much of her reading independently. If she's struggling with comprehension, then we'll go back and read it together, but she seems to be strong in reading comprehension and has a natural ability to memorize quickly.
                  Yes, the Novare books are assigned every day. We are following our own schedule and not the MP plans or the plans on the resource CD. We have tried completing science in 30 minutes, but we found an hour to be much more reasonable. There is a lot of student writing in the Novare books! Not to mention, the student is making all of their own flashcards which takes a ton of time too.

                  FYI....Our Novare schedule:

                  Monday - Thursday:
                  • When we get to a new chapter, student spends a day making all new vocabulary flashcards. (If there are more than 15, I give them 2 days).
                  • After that we read a section per day, and complete the learning check for that section. (Student writes an answer, I check and have them make corrections or improvements.)
                  • When we get to the end of the chapter, we spend one day writing out the end of chapter exercises and reviewing previous flashcards. (Again, student writes an answer to the exercises, I check and have them make corrections or improvements.)
                  • We spend one day making the objective flashcards when we finish the chapter. (If there are a lot, we might spend two days.)

                  Friday:
                  • Every Friday I have them take a quiz. (Just like we do in Latin.). This way they just know to expect it.
                  • I also give them the review guide which they work on all week long (Monday-Thursday).
                  Cathy aka The Attached Mama
                  2019-2020
                  DS 12, 7th Grade
                  DD 11, 6th Grade
                  DS 5, K

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Maran Grace,

                    Your questions hit so close to home from our experience. Briefly, we have moved A LOT (9 times in 20 years). The longest our family has ever lived anywhere was 7 years in Virginia. Most of the kids only remember that as their main "home." Everywhere else was less than three years. Even now, we have only been here for a year and a half. So guess where all of their "friends" are? Yep - Virginia!

                    Everywhere we have ever lived we have tried to plug ourselves in using all the means people routinely suggest - signing up for gymnastics, ballet, nature center classes, swim lessons, Yahoo homeschool groups, playground play groups, email lists of homeschool groups, church prayer groups and youth groups, etc. I have even given this same advice to others in this situation because really, what else are you going to say? Sorry to be blunt, but "blah, blah, blah," is what comes to mind when I think of all of them. We would meet very nice people, and occasionally hit it off with one or another...but never the sort of community that we always craved - as we should; we are human, after all!

                    What these experiences have always done is to make me doubt our choice to homeschool...just as it is doing for you. In each of those times of doubt I would school shop just to see what the options were. Each time I would face the brick wall of realizing that no option was going to be satisfying to us academically, and not even feasible for us financially. I believe these obstacles have helped us stay on the path God wants for our family. But where does that leave us with the issue of friends and community?

                    All this explanation brings me to the one truth we have had to accept time and time again - especially with our high schoolers: Friends are a treasure, and as such, are difficult to come by. Yes, our children crave friendships and relationships, and we would never withhold social relationships from them on purpose. It is frustrating that homeschooling, with all of its blessings and benefits, can at the same time create such a cross for us to carry. Not all homeschoolers have to experience it; but sadly, many of us do.

                    What I have come to realize is that this too is a preparation for real life that our children learn earlier than school-attending peers. It is a sober reality and it forces them into a type of maturity that they don't want yet but is unavoidable in many, many instances. Think about it like learning Latin.

                    By learning Latin, our children learn so many life lessons: diligence, perseverance, sobriety of study, and the reward of hard work. They gain an understanding of language as a whole that is irreplaceable. Their ability to think logically will benefit them every single day of their lives. They develop a gradual understanding of the minds of Roman writers and Roman culture that helps them understand who we are as citizens of Western civilization. Think of how different this makes our children from their peers who have never studied Latin! Their experience in this ONE area of their schooling is enough to make them stand out from mainstream folks who have followed the traditional progressive school programs.

                    I think homeschooling through high school offers an equally formative difference on a magnified scale. They have to accept that most of the people they will meet in life will not be people they will become close with. They have to realize that their attachment to others takes time, that their affections are valuable enough to not give away easily. Their questions of who they are, what they value, what they believe, and who they want to be are taken seriously and addressed by the great minds they are reading, and by the loving attention of (hopefully) wiser adults in their lives - not their peers. THIS IS HARD. Would it be softened by having some peers with whom to share the journey? Absolutely. But what we have found is that siblings have become those peers. That young people they do meet through youth groups, work, or some other type of outside activity are "ok" but offer enough interaction to realize that going to a school would simply accentuate their sense of isolation, not solve it. By high school, they are already so different from their peers that having hundreds of them around them all day long would not actually help.

                    This makes high school a struggle. For sure. But something we ALL have to keep in mind...is that these four years are SO SHORT. They really and truly are. They go by so much faster than say, 2nd through 5th. And the second half of it is largely spent discerning what their next step in life should be. So even though they are continuing to finish their academics, they are also needing so much guidance on what really matters to them in life - what sort of career do they want? do they want to do mission work first? or go right to college? and if college, than what size, location, focus, and cost matters to them? THIS is where you choose things to add to their high school studies to fill out their days. Have them volunteer at an assisted living/nursing home; have them develop their own solution to some problem they see in life; have them try out a class of some sort that might help them figure out a passion or pursuit; have them get a job so they can start saving money for school, or shadow someone who does what they want to do - even if it is unpaid. Have them pray more.

                    Every conversation I have ever had with my teens about going to a brick-and-mortar school has always ended up with all of us realizing that no one wants to stop homeschooling. As long as we take the time to talk it out, to consider the real pros and cons, what they would gain compared with what they would have to give up - it always ends up the same. We give them their time of riding the emotional roller coaster. Their hearts can be quite heavy at times, so we listen and we carry that hurt with them. But they always, ALWAYS emerge with a resolution to be patient for the things they truly want in life. They realize that they are giving up something good for something great - and that is what my dh and I want them to do throughout their whole lives. Talk about a life lesson.

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                    DS, 16
                    DD, 14
                    DD, 12
                    DD, 10
                    DD, 8
                    DD, 6
                    +DS+
                    DS, 2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                      Maran Grace,

                      Your questions hit so close to home from our experience. Briefly, we have moved A LOT (9 times in 20 years). The longest our family has ever lived anywhere was 7 years in Virginia. Most of the kids only remember that as their main "home." Everywhere else was less than three years. Even now, we have only been here for a year and a half. So guess where all of their "friends" are? Yep - Virginia!

                      Everywhere we have ever lived we have tried to plug ourselves in using all the means people routinely suggest - signing up for gymnastics, ballet, nature center classes, swim lessons, Yahoo homeschool groups, playground play groups, email lists of homeschool groups, church prayer groups and youth groups, etc. I have even given this same advice to others in this situation because really, what else are you going to say? Sorry to be blunt, but "blah, blah, blah," is what comes to mind when I think of all of them. We would meet very nice people, and occasionally hit it off with one or another...but never the sort of community that we always craved - as we should; we are human, after all!

                      What these experiences have always done is to make me doubt our choice to homeschool...just as it is doing for you. In each of those times of doubt I would school shop just to see what the options were. Each time I would face the brick wall of realizing that no option was going to be satisfying to us academically, and not even feasible for us financially. I believe these obstacles have helped us stay on the path God wants for our family. But where does that leave us with the issue of friends and community?

                      All this explanation brings me to the one truth we have had to accept time and time again - especially with our high schoolers: Friends are a treasure, and as such, are difficult to come by. Yes, our children crave friendships and relationships, and we would never withhold social relationships from them on purpose. It is frustrating that homeschooling, with all of its blessings and benefits, can at the same time create such a cross for us to carry. Not all homeschoolers have to experience it; but sadly, many of us do.

                      What I have come to realize is that this too is a preparation for real life that our children learn earlier than school-attending peers. It is a sober reality and it forces them into a type of maturity that they don't want yet but is unavoidable in many, many instances. Think about it like learning Latin.

                      By learning Latin, our children learn so many life lessons: diligence, perseverance, sobriety of study, and the reward of hard work. They gain an understanding of language as a whole that is irreplaceable. Their ability to think logically will benefit them every single day of their lives. They develop a gradual understanding of the minds of Roman writers and Roman culture that helps them understand who we are as citizens of Western civilization. Think of how different this makes our children from their peers who have never studied Latin! Their experience in this ONE area of their schooling is enough to make them stand out from mainstream folks who have followed the traditional progressive school programs.

                      I think homeschooling through high school offers an equally formative difference on a magnified scale. They have to accept that most of the people they will meet in life will not be people they will become close with. They have to realize that their attachment to others takes time, that their affections are valuable enough to not give away easily. Their questions of who they are, what they value, what they believe, and who they want to be are taken seriously and addressed by the great minds they are reading, and by the loving attention of (hopefully) wiser adults in their lives - not their peers. THIS IS HARD. Would it be softened by having some peers with whom to share the journey? Absolutely. But what we have found is that siblings have become those peers. That young people they do meet through youth groups, work, or some other type of outside activity are "ok" but offer enough interaction to realize that going to a school would simply accentuate their sense of isolation, not solve it. By high school, they are already so different from their peers that having hundreds of them around them all day long would not actually help.

                      This makes high school a struggle. For sure. But something we ALL have to keep in mind...is that these four years are SO SHORT. They really and truly are. They go by so much faster than say, 2nd through 5th. And the second half of it is largely spent discerning what their next step in life should be. So even though they are continuing to finish their academics, they are also needing so much guidance on what really matters to them in life - what sort of career do they want? do they want to do mission work first? or go right to college? and if college, than what size, location, focus, and cost matters to them? THIS is where you choose things to add to their high school studies to fill out their days. Have them volunteer at an assisted living/nursing home; have them develop their own solution to some problem they see in life; have them try out a class of some sort that might help them figure out a passion or pursuit; have them get a job so they can start saving money for school, or shadow someone who does what they want to do - even if it is unpaid. Have them pray more.

                      Every conversation I have ever had with my teens about going to a brick-and-mortar school has always ended up with all of us realizing that no one wants to stop homeschooling. As long as we take the time to talk it out, to consider the real pros and cons, what they would gain compared with what they would have to give up - it always ends up the same. We give them their time of riding the emotional roller coaster. Their hearts can be quite heavy at times, so we listen and we carry that hurt with them. But they always, ALWAYS emerge with a resolution to be patient for the things they truly want in life. They realize that they are giving up something good for something great - and that is what my dh and I want them to do throughout their whole lives. Talk about a life lesson.

                      AMDG,
                      Sarah
                      Standing up and applauding. Solid gold. Printing this out and putting it in my homeschool binder.
                      Plans for 2019-20

                      DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
                      DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
                      DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                      DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                      DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
                      DS6 - 5 - MP K

                      [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

                      Comment


                        #12

                        thanks, Dianna!

                        <3,
                        Sarah
                        2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                        DS, 16
                        DD, 14
                        DD, 12
                        DD, 10
                        DD, 8
                        DD, 6
                        +DS+
                        DS, 2

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Sarah,

                          I wholehearted agree with Dianna. Thank you for sharing your wisdom. This was so well said.

                          Melisa
                          Melisa

                          Homeschooling mom for 10 years

                          dd - 9th grade using MP and Homeschool Connections
                          ds - 7th grade using MP

                          Comment


                            #14
                            My family is the opposite of Sarah’s in one major way...we have never moved out of the area. My husband and I moved once when my 17yo was 3, but that was only 5 miles back to the house that I grew up in. I know I live close to many of those kids that I went to high school with, but I was never more than good acquaintances with most of them and haven’t seen but one or two around since I graduated almost 30 years ago. School in and of itself isn’t going to necessarily provide good friends, and similar to Sarah’s experiences just highlighted how different I was from all of those people. True friends (the ones you will keep up with beyond when your paths quit crossing) are few and far between for most people. Despite having never moved we still have trouble finding friends that are a good match. Our friends have been from Trail Life/AHG and church....they end up seeing those friends at other activities such as homeschool choir and field biology. They get a good dose of public school/Catholic school high school drama by hanging around the other kids at swim practice. Neither of my older children desire to go to school and after a year at senior practice I don’t think you could pay my daughter enough to deal with those girls every day.

                            Good luck helping her find her spot. Maybe some kind of volunteer position would provide her some outside time. My daughter really enjoyed volunteering at the library and was asked to apply for a job.
                            Dorinda

                            For 2019-2020
                            DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
                            DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
                            DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
                            DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by TheAttachedMama View Post
                              I don't mean to derail your thread, Maran Grace. But can you please tell me your secret? My son is taking a similar course load, and I would LOVE to be finished that early.
                              Do you do everything that is assigned? Do you skip parts? Do others find this time estimate to be typical?

                              You see, we have the exact opposite problem. My 7th grade son is taking a similar course load (with a few equal substitutions), and his school day typically runs from 8AM-5PM most days! (With an hour lunch.) He does spend a lot of time on math each day, but even if I didn't count math, he wouldn't be done until 3PM. I've been looking for ways to shorten his day without sacrificing the integrity of the curriculum. My friend tells me that this is just how long the upper grades take. Is she wrong?


                              Just to give you an idea of how long each subject takes us....
                              Latin takes us an hour each day. And we are only doing Second Form Latin. (We do flashcards, grammar review, recitation, spelling practice, workbook, and check.)
                              Literature + Poetry take an hour each day. (Go over vocabulary words/reading notes, check comprehension questions/enrichment (assigned independently), read new chapter together, have discussion.)
                              Novare physical science takes us an hour each day (Read Chapter, Complete Learning check and then go over together and make improvements to answers, make flashcards or complete a review)
                              Grammar/Spelling/Composition take us about 2 hours per day
                              We schedule an hour a day to rotate through Christian Studies/Geography II/Geography I review/Timeline Composition work
                              FMMA/FMOG takes us about 30 mins per day, etc, etc., etc. etc.

                              Do you complete all of the tests? Maybe it just takes my kids a bit longer to master the material than most? I don't know.

                              To answer your question about socialization, I have found that I often have to make my own opportunities in that area. I started a group on meetup.com for homeschoolers. We meet for boardgames, trips to the zoo, field trips, nature walks, park days, tea, Shakespeare club, etc. etc. All of those things are just extras---but the true benefit to the group has been that all of my children have a close group of friends which I think is important. We started the group when my oldest was 4, and now my oldest is 13. So my kids have sort of grown up with these kids. So my advice: if you want something, don't be afraid to chase after it! Typically, if you are feeling a need for something, I bet there are others in your community who are too!
                              Cathy,
                              I don’t think your timing for your kids are that far off. There is no way my 8th grader would be done in 4 hours and we don’t do complete cores. Novare took us awhile when he did earth science. This year he is doing a homeschool field biology class at UMich-Dearborn which he loves, but isn’t time efficient either.
                              Dorinda

                              For 2019-2020
                              DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
                              DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
                              DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
                              DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

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