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    #16
    Hello.

    For Introductory Physics, Novare says this: Students should be enrolled in concurrent algebra I to use this book, which is standard track mathematics for 9th grade. We make our exercises challenging, requiring students to utilize multiple concepts and skills to arrive at an answer, but nothing higher than basic algebra is required for this text. This book does not use trigonometry.

    For Physics: Modeling Nature (which I don't think you would be using in 9th grade anyway), you would need to have taken trigonometry before taking this course.

    Tanya

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      #17
      Originally posted by Esther View Post

      Just adding a data point here to say we did Novare ES with a 5th and 7th grader last year. For my younger son I scaled back my quiz expectations and helped them with study topics. This year we are using Physical Science for now 6th and 8th grade. No problems there. For my 6th grader I am thinking of a Physics first sequence because I know he will go on to do an extra year of physics (maybe one of the Novare texts?) for 12th grade, he is more on an engineering track, disassembling everything in the house, etc. For my 9th grader next year, I will use Novare Biology and a more typical Bio-Chem-Phys sequence because I know he will take that 12th grade year and do Anatomy or Marine Biology, not sure.

      In any case, I haven't assessed that Earth Science or Physical Science was more difficult, except that we had a definite learning curve with the Novare program, and it could be that it was more difficult for ES because of that. Now that we are tracking with the sequence, it seems easier.

      Home Science Tools carries the Novare kits but I haven't used them- still a fair amount of building and setup involved in the experiments, but we are making it work.

      Following along on what people think the level is for the various Physics offerings. I definitely want to be teaching Physics and not Physical Science when we get to the high school level.
      AH, I'm happy to hear this! My oldest two are 24 months apart. My younger two are only 17 months apart. I always thought my younger two would do more subjects together, but that middle child is showing me that he is more on par with the older. It's encouraging to hear this sequence is working for you!
      Christine

      (2019/2020)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
      DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

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        #18
        Following along on what people think the level is for the various Physics offerings. I definitely want to be teaching Physics and not Physical Science when we get to the high school level. [/QUOTE]

        I have had students take Physical Science (9th grade level) with Prentice Hall, a trig based physics through Kolbe, Novare Physical science, Novare IP, and physics at a public school. IP falls solidly between “physical science” and typical “high school physics”. It certainly has more than the PH Physical Science book but not anywhere near what a typical high school physics (trig based) is. And not just the math- the concepts are way simplified and many topics are missing. For instance, momentum. The idea was taught but the only problems were very simple two balls hitting each other. He gave two different equations depending on whether a big ball hit a small ball or reversed. You really only need one equation- just use proper direction signs. In trig physics you could do balls hitting at an angle. I get that you can’t do that with just algebra, but if they hit in a linear way, you should be able to calculate which direction each ball goes and how fast just with the basic momentum equation. Instead he made them memorize different situations. If big ball hits little ball do this. If little ball hits big ball do that. If little ball is faster than big ball do this. If big ball is faster than little ball do that. I felt the actual physics wasn’t really taught. That’s just one example.
        IP was perfect for my average student. She needed an “easy” science. And this was. I would have been just as happy if she had done PH Physical Scienec. I know she probably won’t take “physics” so Introductory Physics was enough. But don’t kid yourself and think IP is full blown physics just without vectors. It’s very watered down. Which is all that many student need.
        for my son who will take vector physics, he will do IP in 8th grade instead of Physical Science which he did in 6th.

        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 21, chemistry major
        DS, 18, Physics major
        DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
        DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
        DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

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          #19
          Originally posted by momgineer View Post
          for my son who will take vector physics, he will do IP in 8th grade instead of Physical Science which he did in 6th.
          Just chiming in to day thanks! This is exactly what I was thinking for my math-strong 7th grader. He'll be in 8th next year and finished/finishing AOPS Alg A and talks like engineering may be in his future, so IP seems like a good fit for science It's always helpful to hear what others have done with their STEM-bent kids.
          Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys (7A, 6M, 2), classics major

          "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Nerdmom View Post

            Just chiming in to day thanks! This is exactly what I was thinking for my math-strong 7th grader. He'll be in 8th next year and finished/finishing AOPS Alg A and talks like engineering may be in his future, so IP seems like a good fit for science It's always helpful to hear what others have done with their STEM-bent kids.
            If you don’t already own IP, I suggest maybe doing Asvanced Studies in Physics and Chemistry. It’s the advanced version of IP. It has more topics in chemistry (IP also has a bit of chemistry) and it selves a tad bit deeper from what i can tell. There are two topics in IP that are “optional” in the Novare lesson plans that aren’t in ASPC but they are fully covered in Modeling Nature (the vector physics book). The only reason i am doing IP instead of ASPC is that i already own IP from my daughter and I don’t want to spend over $100 for the advanced version. If I were buying from scratch for my son, I’d buy ASPC.
            Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
            DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
            DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
            DS, 21, chemistry major
            DS, 18, Physics major
            DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
            DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
            DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by momgineer View Post

              If you don’t already own IP, I suggest maybe doing Asvanced Studies in Physics and Chemistry. It’s the advanced version of IP. It has more topics in chemistry (IP also has a bit of chemistry) and it selves a tad bit deeper from what i can tell. There are two topics in IP that are “optional” in the Novare lesson plans that aren’t in ASPC but they are fully covered in Modeling Nature (the vector physics book). The only reason i am doing IP instead of ASPC is that i already own IP from my daughter and I don’t want to spend over $100 for the advanced version. If I were buying from scratch for my son, I’d buy ASPC.
              I'm thinking we'll do MPOA, since my time is stretched and he does well with the online format. (I hope I'm not the only one whose boys respond better to someone other than mom!) But if that changes, I'll definitely get the ASPC instead. Thanks for the tip!
              Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys (7A, 6M, 2), classics major

              "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by momgineer View Post

                If you don’t already own IP, I suggest maybe doing Asvanced Studies in Physics and Chemistry. It’s the advanced version of IP. It has more topics in chemistry (IP also has a bit of chemistry) and it selves a tad bit deeper from what i can tell. There are two topics in IP that are “optional” in the Novare lesson plans that aren’t in ASPC but they are fully covered in Modeling Nature (the vector physics book). The only reason i am doing IP instead of ASPC is that i already own IP from my daughter and I don’t want to spend over $100 for the advanced version. If I were buying from scratch for my son, I’d buy ASPC.
                Look it over carefully. MP doesn’t have ASPC in their sequence, and (the previous edition) was a bad fit for us here. I’ve seen reviews both good and bad for this- I think it would work for a particular kind of student (not mine, lol).
                Bean. Long time MP user.

                DD- 9th grade aerospace enthusiast. Using a mix of dual credit, online and classical materials for 2019-2020.

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