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need help with Muellers Caesar

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    need help with Muellers Caesar

    My 11th grade daughter is struggling with Muellers Caesar. She's been through Prima, Latina I + II, the Form series, and Henle I + II, and her Latin is pretty good (but not perfect). She really enjoys Latin and is frustrated that her translations are rarely similar to what the answer key gives. Can anyone give me advice to help her with her translations, and/or the grading? She does the class on her own (work + grading).

    #2
    I would be glad to help you with the Mueller text. The best way to know how to begin to help would be to see an example of a sentence that she translated very differently from the key. There are legitimate variations in word order and vocabulary choices, so she may not be as far "off" as it seems to her now. I do not have the Mueller answer key, but, if you want to give an example of a sentence that she finds difficult, I could tell you how it may be translated. You need not write out the entire Latin sentence; you can cite it by book, chapter, sentence. For example, in Book 4, chapter 25, the first sentence is cited as 4.25.1.

    Bonnie



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      #3
      Bonnie, sorry for delay in replying. Thank you so much for offering to help. Can you give me any guidance on 4.29.8-14, the sentence beginning with, "Neque enim naves..."? She just translated that sentence today and didn't get any of it correct.

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        #4
        I'll give you a fairly literal translation, so she can see the Latin constructions. Always begin by knowing the context. The Romans sailed from Gaul to Britain, and, in the preceding sentences, Caesar said that there was a storm that damaged many of his ships.

        Try to see the sentence as clauses and even smaller word groups. I inserted parentheses to mark off the subordinate clauses:
        Neque enim naves erant aliae (quibus reportari possent),
        et omnia deerant (quae ad reficiendas naves erant usui),
        et, (quod omnibus constabat hiemari in Gallia oportere), frumentum in his locis in hiemem provisum non erat.

        For neither were there other ships by which they were able to be carried back,
        and all things were lacking which were for use/useful for the ships to be repaired/for repairing the ships
        and, because it was evident to all that it behooved (them)/that they ought to winter in Gaul,
        grain in these places had not been provided for the winter.


        (To sum up, they have no other ships to sail back to Gaul; what is useful for repairing ships is lacking; and, because it is best to winter in Gaul, they have not planned for a winter grain supply in Britain.)

        Note a few things about the structure:
        quibus ... possent is a relative characteristic clause modifying naves (takes the subjunctive);
        quae ... usui is a relative clause modifying omnia (nom. pl. neuter); usui is the dative of purpose;
        ad reficiendas naves is a gerundive construction expressing purpose: literally, for the ships to be repaired.
        quod ... oportere is a causal clause.

        How did she do with the lessons in Henle Second Year? Did she study all the references for the Henle Grammar? And did she do any of the Caesar readings in that textbook -- like Helvetian Drive to the West?

        Bonnie


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