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    grading system

    I am never confident about grading. How much do I take off for this or that, how much do I weigh quizzes vs tests, should I give grades for daily work at all? What about extra credit? In the younger years I never bothered - we corrected everything and moved on. Now I have older kids who want grades -- and my umbrella strongly prefers to see grades as well. I've been trying things out for a couple years, but I'm still not confident. I need a system. My older 2 take some classes online and at co-op, and teachers do offer extra credit, so I think it would be fair to do...but I'm never sure how to go about it. I don't want to give "mom grades" but I don't want to be unfairly strict.

    I'm particularly unsure with regard to Latin. In a conjugation/declension chart, do you give one point for each word? So six points for present tense, six for imperfect, etc? Half points for spelling, or all or nothing? At Teacher Training, I remember hearing that the HLS teacher awarded one point for each Latin word in translation sections. But I always wonder about those long pages of conjugations/declensions.

    I'd really love a book with a good system all laid out. ;-) Any suggestions?

    Hey, maybe this could be a SG breakout topic? (But please, someone help me before then. ;-))
    Melanie
    2019-2020 ~ 6th MP year; 11th year homeschooling
    DD16 ~ 10th grade MPOA diploma program
    DD13 ~ 8th grade
    DS11 ~ 5th grade

    #2
    When I took Latin as a kid, every Latin word counted as 1 point. I've continued that with my kids (and my 20+ other Latin students) and it works well enough. On a declension chart, each word would count as a point.

    Very early on, if the kid makes a consistent but intelligent mistake, I deduct for the mistake but not every occurrence of it. For example, if the kids filled the imperfect verb chart in as ambam, ambas, ambat, ambamus, ambatis, ambant (missing the a from the stem, but getting the endings correct), I might take one or two off but not 6. This is generally only in the first quarter or so of First Form until kids get a hang of the memorization. I also only have my students once a week, so it might be different if I were in a traditional classroom and graded their work more than once per week.

    Latin spelling definitely counts. English spelling I might be lenient on if it is a young kid (my First Form class ranges from 5th to 10th grade) or if I know the kids has dyslexia or similar.

    HTH!
    Amanda
    Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

    "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by melaneesa View Post
      I am never confident about grading. ... I'm particularly unsure with regard to Latin.
      Good evening Melanie,

      We've received so many questions about grading Latin that we've developed a suggested rubric. I've shared beta versions of it on the forum before, but here's the final one. These guidelines will be added to the front of the Quizzes & Tests as they are reprinted.

      HTH!
      Attached Files
      Michael
      Memoria Press

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks, Michael! I think I'll grade this week's quizzes using both my typical scale and this one. It will be an interesting comparison!
        Amanda
        Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

        "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Michael View Post

          Good evening Melanie,

          We've received so many questions about grading Latin that we've developed a suggested rubric. I've shared beta versions of it on the forum before, but here's the final one. These guidelines will be added to the front of the Quizzes & Tests as they are reprinted.

          HTH!
          This is just beautiful. Bless you.
          Katie

          2019/20 6th year with MP
          DS 15: 10th, MPOA: Latin & HS Comp II
          DD 12: 7th, MPOA: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Chreia/Maxim & Ref/Con
          DD 9: 4th using 3A
          Twin DD's 7: 1st

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            #6
            Thanks, Michael. That is helpful.
            Can anyone share guidelines for grading more generally? Do you give grades for daily work? Do you offer extra credit? How do you weigh quizzes and tests, and is daily work included in that formula?
            Melanie
            2019-2020 ~ 6th MP year; 11th year homeschooling
            DD16 ~ 10th grade MPOA diploma program
            DD13 ~ 8th grade
            DS11 ~ 5th grade

            Comment


              #7
              Personally, I don't give grades for daily work. If I did grade daily work, it would be either complete or incomplete - 100 or 0 for a daily assignment. The only Extra Credit I gave was for Extra Credit that was already on the quizzes/tests.
              Here was my grading approach for Third Form Latin:
              Quizzes - 50%
              Tests - 25%
              Final Exam - 25%
              You could reduce one of those percentages and give 10% for daily work, or something like that if you wanted to.
              Hope that helps!

              Comment


                #8
                The online classes give a participation grade. I usually figure in a participation grade in most classes and it generally involves doing homework willingly and having a good attitude and discussing the material with me. I don’t really keep a numerical score for participation.
                Dorinda

                For 2019-2020
                DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
                DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
                DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
                DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

                Comment


                  #9
                  What about the 9th grade history class? There were 3 tests. That's it. No quizzes, nothing else to grade. Did you/Would you just average those three scores for a course grade?

                  The 9th grade literature was difficult for me, as well. Some books had quizzes. Some had tests. Some had both. I had a hard time deciding how to average those fairly.
                  Melanie
                  2019-2020 ~ 6th MP year; 11th year homeschooling
                  DD16 ~ 10th grade MPOA diploma program
                  DD13 ~ 8th grade
                  DS11 ~ 5th grade

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by melaneesa View Post
                    What about the 9th grade history class? There were 3 tests. That's it. No quizzes, nothing else to grade. Did you/Would you just average those three scores for a course grade?

                    The 9th grade literature was difficult for me, as well. Some books had quizzes. Some had tests. Some had both. I had a hard time deciding how to average those fairly.
                    I'm a recovering non-grader too, and it's very hard. For history and literature classes, participation is key, whether through MP student book questions or open discussion - or a combination. Has the student consistently prepared for each class, or has he been studying only now and then? Was he ready to volunteer an answer, or did the teacher have to call on him explicitly? Were the answers consistently correct when having to do with objective facts? Were open-ended questions answered thoughtfully? Then there is a style component too: using good grammar, answering a question with precise language, making an argument with good logic, things like that. Tests and quizzes in such classes shouldn't be the only things taken into account for a final grade: I think a good teacher knows this, and learns to "keep track" of students, so to speak. It's a little harder for us at home, I think, or at least it is for me

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by melaneesa View Post
                      What about the 9th grade history class? There were 3 tests. That's it. No quizzes, nothing else to grade. Did you/Would you just average those three scores for a course grade?

                      The 9th grade literature was difficult for me, as well. Some books had quizzes. Some had tests. Some had both. I had a hard time deciding how to average those fairly.
                      I'm moderating 9th Grade Lit this year for the Vita Beata Discussion Group. Each of the families involved seem to have different expectations and do grading differently. Some alternate assigning the quiz/test with an essay. Some focus on the essays, and some don't assign essays at all. I think that it probably varies depending on if your student is doing additional writing specifically in Classical Composition or not. What I can tell you is that regardless of the grading technique of each family, the students are prepared to discuss deep topics and bring insights they have drawn from reading challenging material. I'm not sure that any grade issued for a quiz or test can capture that benefit. However, I personally would give each of the students in my discussion class an "A," and I have never seen any of their written assignments they do for their parents.

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