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  • Mary
    replied
    I am back with an update. )

    I appreciate all of the responses here - it is nice to hear how others are traveling this road and to see what I might be able to borrow from others' experiences. Thank you. <3

    I did break up some of the assigned readings (especially with Concise History) and have spread them out over each week. This has been a HUGE help to dd, who has to budget her energy as well as her time. We all agree that we like round-robin reading because it helps me to help her - I am able to see outward signs that she needs to go take medications or take a break and can give her a heads up that she needs to attend to this before going into a downward spiral. It might mean more work for me right now, but helping her to recognize these early signs will be so very important for her as she continues through high school and gradually takes on more independent work.

    Since dd's goal is to try to get her health to a place where she can re-enter the MPOA diploma program (fingers crossed for next year!), we are keeping up with all of the required classes. She took Foundations of Comp with Mrs. RdF last year (highly recommend - so good) but will need Chreia/Maxim and Ref/Con for graduation if she goes back to the MPOA. Since her younger brother is also taking Chreia - Ref/Con this year, I am teaching them both at the same time. We have a schedule now - we meet in our homeschooling room at 7:15am (they, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed...me, stumbling in sloshing coffee everywhere) and we begin that lesson. I am at the white board recording their answers and leading discussion and then they copy this down into their books, writing each ensuing rough draft paragraph independently, with input as-needed. Then we move on to science. Dd takes a medication/rest break while I go through ds's earth science lesson and then he sits and answers his learning check questions while I teach her physical science lesson.

    Then they go to do their daily Latin (and Greek) homework from their outside class while I sit with dd8 and do her SC 2 lessons.

    dd8 works on her workbook assignments while I then sit on the couch and go through history and literature with the big kids. Because they have some online classes (Latin and Greek), this has varied a bit, but we are getting it all done. I turned the Iliad into a read-aloud (which is helping me bc I'm taking the CiRCE Atrium on rhetoric this year and I need to read the book, anyway).

    I started ds12 on the Video Text lessons and he is doing so well - he loves them! Whew! Subtract prealgebra from my plate!
    Additionally, dd14 is reading her Logic I chapter, then watching Mr. Cothran's video lesson, then re-reading her chapter, as necessary, and filling out her logic workbook each day. She gives an enthusiastic two-thumbs-up to the logic videos. Again, a win for me! I have Mr. Cothran in my home teaching logic!

    Our days are still long but they are so much more manageable now - especially with readings broken into more manageable daily bites and Mr. Cothran and Mr. Clark coming into my house and teaching (ha!).

    It was also super helpful for me to find the answers to the learning check questions for Novare science. I was working through them myself to be sure the kids got them correct. What a time-saver to be able to just look at the sample answer to something like, say, percent slope than to calculate it on my own and hope I got the answer correct. *cue the weary laughter and head smacking -here-*


    My days will not always be this way. As dd becomes more attuned and responsive to her body's signals, she will not need me sitting with her to help gauge her energy. As she becomes more confident in her ability to read and absorb material, she won't want Mom sitting and reading along with her. She was already independent (following her own homework/class schedule) with Latin, Greek and math. She has now added logic to that list. I am totally okay with doing literature and history and science with her because I feel those are appropriate places to spend my time and energy. She loves the discussion and she has said she always wants it. I am happy to provide.

    DS is independent in math and Latin. As he gets older, he will likely be my independent science kid - he eats this stuff up and has no issues with comprehension.

    So, yeah, I'm a little tired and the house is a little cluttered and sometimes dinner is late...but it is much better than that first week where I swore I would die. *laughs, rolls eyes* Thanks again for your responses. And if you want my new, broken-down schedule for Concise History, I'll be happy to share. I am only scheduling in 2- and 3-week chunks, as I just never know when illness or calamity will strike and wreak havoc on my best-laid plans...
    Last edited by Mary; 09-19-2019, 11:45 AM. Reason: cleaned up a few errors

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  • Cindy in Indy
    replied
    Originally posted by KF2000 View Post

    2) My kids have had to learn to accept that their to-do list never gets completely done either. And I have come to realize that this is actually better training for real life than in their younger years when they do get every box checked every single day. When I was in high school, I pushed myself from dawn to the wee hours of the night every single day with honors classes, sports, and clubs. Not a very balanced life, and a skill I have had to learn in adulthood. These guys are learning it much earlier and personally I think it will be good for them.
    This is **GOLDEN**. What a great life lesson to teach your children!

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  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    Mary,
    If you want to do more read together, have you considered postponing traditional logic until they older two could do it together? It would give time for the new DVD’s to be completed. It is an important subject, but I don’t think it has to happen in 9th grade. You could also delay it until after Christmas and just target getting the first book completed. It sounds like you have a lot of transitions going on, make sure to keep expectations realistic.

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  • Mrs Bee
    replied
    This is so revealing to me, because this past year I've felt like a failure whenever I couldn't keep up with them and asked them to work on their own in history (Guerber) and literature (The Trojan War). I didn't see it at all as nudging them towards independence. It looks like I haven't learned to be at peace with a to-do list that doesn't get completed: I just think it's all my fault, that I must have done something wrong. How much I've still to learn!!
    Very excited to see new Logic DVDs in the making: we're going to love doing them as a family!

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Mom2mthj View Post
    ... I thought Martin was doing a new recording this past year. Maybe Michael can comment on when those will be available.
    Hello Dorinda,

    Yes, we are working on a second edition of the Traditional Logic I & II instructional videos that will feature new recordings by Martin Cothran. He and our videographer still have some editing left to do (I believe the technical term is "post-production" ), so we do not yet have an estimated release date.

    HTH!

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  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    Originally posted by Mary View Post
    I wasn't sure where to put this, as I'm talking about a 9th grader, 7th grader and a kiddo just switching over to SC (level 2). I hope the moderator(s) will move this if needed. :-)


    My 9th grader does VideoText math (love that they've partnered with MP!) and does ancient Greek and Latin translation classes online. Otherwise, I am teaching all other subjects according to the MP 9th grade core.

    Similarly, my 7th grader is taking Latin online and I am teaching all other MP 7th grade core subjects, subbing Novare Earth Science in for Trees/Tiner Biology.

    Lastly, my 8-year-old is following the SC Level 2 sequence.


    It goes without saying that my 8-year-old has a lot of "at elbow" time with me. This is not an issue.

    My older two like to round-robin read history, literature, logic, and science with me. I happen to really like these subjects and I enjoy reading and discussing with them. They are both very motivated kids and, without any prodding from me, get up early to work on Greek/Latin homework and review their science flashcards, etc. My 9th grader also does her VideoText math lessons solo during this time. I start my "office hours" for them between 8 and 9am, when I am finished with Little Sister. We work solidly together this time, breaking for lunch and taking short breaks for snacks, until 3 or 4pm daily. Some days, we might go a bit later, especially if I need to work a little longer with my 8-year-old. In the evenings, we still do read-alouds. We are tag-teaming "The Scarlet Pimpernel" and "Pride and Prejudice" - purely for enjoyment (mine included).

    Basically, my days involve me teaching my 8-year-old, then her going off to do her homework while I work with one of the Bigs. Then that Big goes off to write out his/her flashcards and/or homework while I work with the other Big...repeat forty-eleven times, with a few sessions of everyone together discussing/arguing/asking questions (literature is great for that). In between, the Little will come to show me completed work or to ask me to fire up the iron to fuse together her latest Perler bead creation. *weary laugh* The older kids do not need oversight or reminders with regard to homework, flashcards or projects (aside from some science experiments). When they go off to do work, I know they're working.

    I do not mind teaching my kids and I know how blessed I am to have children who: 1) enjoy learning and 2) enjoy being with their mother. *insert puffy cartoon hearts floating around my head -here-*
    However, I am exhausted. By the end of each day, I am physically and mentally spent...and then it's time to make dinner and do the dishes. (Thank God for the crock pot!)

    I have questions for Moms Who Have Been Here:

    1. Will this feeling of sheer exhaustion and mental overload begin to get better as the year progresses? That is, is what I'm feeling merely a case of First Week of School Overload?

    2. I am teaching ds12 prealgebra, which I can do well but I don't *love*. I am seriously thinking of just switching him over to VideoText, as well - especially since I already own the entire program. He is a math wiz and self-motivated. Do you see a problem with letting him be more autonomous with regard to math at this age/grade level?

    3. I am toying with breaking up some of the Concise History lessons so that my dd14 and I are not going blind reading several pages of 6 pt. type twice per week. I think we'd rather read fewer pages of 6-pt. type and go blind more slowly... *LOL* Do you see a problem with reading a few pages and answering a few questions each day rather than reading larger chunks/doing larger assignments fewer timesper week?

    4. I had begun reading through the Iliad with dd14 this summer and having her do the workbook/quizzes and tests, since she missed Iliad/Odyssey last year. We are about 1/3 finished. I am toying with switching this over to merely a read-along, with us tag-team reading and discussing. Do you think this is a bad idea?

    5. I love teaching Logic, but that would be the next logical (ha!) subject that might fall to independent study. Are Mr. Cothran's logic videos a good substitute for Mom standing at the white board lecturing and outlining key points? I took the class myself a few years ago but, admittedly, never cracked open the DVDs.

    6. Are there other things I'm overlooking here? Any suggestions, hints, tips you can think of that might help me stay involved with the kids (which they want) maintain my sanity?
    Mary,

    No great answers, but I will try to share what we do. First, it probably will get better, but probably not good enough to keep the exhaustion at bay. It is one thing to read aloud 2nd grade literature or the mammals book or FMOR as they are all relatively short. You are describing a whole different ball of wax when you talk concise history, earth science, upper school literature times two children. For one thing, I can read as fast out loud as I can to myself. Also, my voice would be shot by the end of the day if I tried it. After a couple of years of Son light I can still tell a difference in my read aloud stamina. It is still a priority, but I have to be much more selective. Unless there is a medical reason to read it aloud, then I would assign history and science and logic as read to yourself and keep literature as a read together experience. Maybe concise history is thrilling, but I can’t imagine reading that aloud and I love history. Iliad I would put in the read aloud category if you have time. I think read aloud and discussion is enough. I did not give tests when my daughter did delectare discussions...if it were total self study then I would make up my own shorter tests.

    I don’t know lots about videotext, but if I owned it and liked it then I would ditch pre-algebra and start videotext. The beginning basically covers prealgebra topics. My kids didn’t love the DVD’s for logic, but I thought Martin was doing a new recording this past year. Maybe Michael can comment on when those will be available.

    My sixth grader still needs a lot of elbow time, but wants to be more independent so I try to give him whatever he can handle. My goal is to be more coach/facilitator/tutor than teacher by the middle of high school. Keep them on track, show them how to plan while making sure I keep track of big deadlines, find resources, answer questions or more importantly help them find the answers themselves, and check that the assignments are actually getting done. I can’t do all the work because doing school isn’t my job right now. It isn’t an easy transition mentally, but has been good for all of us.

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  • Mary
    replied
    I sincerely appreciate all of your responses and I have enjoyed reading through them and gleaning so many bits of wisdom. Thank you!

    Last year, my oldest took all of her classes online. She tested into the MPOA diploma program and our plan was for her to continue along this path. After extended illness, along with the new diagnosis that promises more of these episodes, we realized this would not be sustainable for her and she decided to only take her Latin translation and Ancient Greek online.

    My ds prefers mom-taught subjects, but I did transfer him to Latin online because I made the decision some time ago to teach my children through SFL, then transfer them to online teachers. This is working well.

    My youngest just transferred over to Simply Classical after I realized that she is not moving at "her own happy pace" (as I'd indicated before on my signature line); rather, she has some real learning issues.

    I know that my days are likely easier than most because I only have three kids to teach. I was only teaching two last year, both of which were grades I'd taught before. I think that might be part of why this year has been a serious slap in the face - I didn't teach 8th grade last year, only a 6th grader and a K/1 mashup. Now I'm faced with 9th grade, 7th grade (two rather intensive years - especially with Novare Science subbed in for the 7th grader) - with no ramp-up. Additionally, I am switching up how I teach my youngest - SC is all new to me, too. (And thank God for cherylswope ! She has been an invaluable help!)

    My dd misses the discussions she was having in her classes last year. My son likes reading aloud with me, having discussion, and marking his book first before re-reading passages and doing homework. Truth be told, I really enjoy literature and history and I look forward to these discussions. Selfishly, I want to hang on to those and I am pretty sure I can set up a schedule that will allow me to do that. The issue is that since this is my first foray into high school, I want to be sure my plan is sound. We have plenty of discussions at dinner and in the car and they are totally independent with regard to online Latin (and, for dd, also math and Ancient Greek), but my kids like to have me formally sitting with them and doing their literature/history/science. I am happy to do it, so I'll do my best to teach what I can teach in this manner and do it well.

    I sat down this morning while my son was at his chess club meet and started carving up the next 2 weeks in the big kids' CGs. Here's what I'm going to try:

    1. I am starting my son on VideoText math tomorrow. He is a very "math-y" kid, self-motivated and organized. I think he will do well.

    2. I am going to work the Guerber study guide questions into our discussions but will only require that he fill out the 200 Questions book. (Thanks Michael for telling me this is how it's done at HLS!)

    3. I carved up dd's 9th grade schedule for the next two weeks and assigned smaller portions of Concise History across 5 days rather than one or two large portions in the same number of days.

    4. DD and I will continue reading the Iliad together, using the Study Guide questions orally only.

    5. The Story of Christianity will be a read-aloud with SG used in discussion. The older kids are in a robust Christian Studies program through church, so this isn't a necessity - it's a "nice to have".

    5. I am going to watch the second (and maybe third) lessons on the Logic DVDs to see if they'll be a good stand-in for me teaching logic. DD is not as excited to let this go, so I'll save the DVDs as a last resort if my other amendments still don't buy me the time/sanity I need.



    I am very lucky in that 7th and 9th grades have a lot of overlap with regard to history and some literature. Reading The Trojan War, Book of the Ancient Romans, FMoG, Story of the Thirteen Colonies..., and Concise History gives so much overlap that both kids end up discussing the material together (ds started doing his homework at the kitchen table instead of in his room so that he could listen in). Also, dd missed out on a lot of Earth Science because of illness last year. She has been listening in to her brother's lessons, which have some carryover into her Physical Science lessons. While we are not in a place to be combining subjects anymore, there is so much crossover that they do lend themselves to kids being in the same room and jumping in on discussion. :-)

    I'll give this a couple of weeks, allowing wiggle room for tweaks along the way, and we'll see how it goes. :-)

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  • KF2000
    replied
    Hi Mary!

    We have made a routine of how we handle high school that stems out of necessity. I could repeat what Jodi said about 1 of me, but then I'd double the # of them. Can't fight the truth of the number of minutes in the day. And when you have so much to do, every single minute matters. With that thought in mind, there is one big thing I have had to accept.

    And that is, my homeschool does not resemble a school. The experience these guys are having is not what would happen in a classroom with a teacher. It's JUST*NOT*POSSIBLE. So the way it has happened in our house is that the independence they begin to develop in 3rd grade naturally progresses to the point where in high school, they are handling much of everything themselves, and I simply answer questions as needed and check in on discussion as time allows. This is unfortunately necessary because I still have little ones who have to learn the basics and they get the lion's share of my productive school time. (Translation: I know it is not ideal, and I consider what they miss out on as part of the sacrifice we make for having a large family and still feeling called to homeschool through high school). But we do have a lot of dinner table conversations just like Jodi described. Or they take place in the car, or out in the yard while kids are playing frisbee, or in the family room before/after rosary, etc. It just seems to be part of our family's life rhythm. We make use of DVD's and an online service that offers unlimited recorded classes for some things, but mostly we just stick to the good old-fashioned textbook and guide route. For classes I am making up myself, we use Quizlet as a way for them to record drill-type questions to study and then be able to take quizzes on that material. Then I make four tests per year for those subjects.

    Now, I do have a very good friend here who has a much different situation. She has two children, close in age to each other, who she recently brought home to resume homeschooling after trying a local classical high school. The older one is a junior, the younger one is a sophomore. She shared with me that a big goal of hers for this year was that she wanted her children to learn how to learn more independently. Until now, she has been able to handle teaching every subject to them directly. When she shared this with me, it caused me to really ponder how vastly different each family's experiences are. I am so happy her children have had that experience with her even though it does create a sting for me of how much I have not been able to do with my own children.

    That being said, my kids are still home with me. I am still actively involved in every single day of their lives. They still find time to ask me all their burning questions even if I occasionally am answering with toothpicks holding my eyes open. It just doesn't usually happen during "school time." I am still preparing them to handle the emotional ups and downs of life and guiding them toward making their own decisions. And there are always surprises along the way. For example, this year I really wanted to have a mostly "at home" day all week, minimizing any and all appointments and running around. Well, then at the last minute we added a class for my son at the local CC. Every single day we are out the door by 7:15. !!! So much for plans !!! But, the crazy thing is, we realized that while he's at class, that gives us the perfect amount of time to scoot over to our church for daily Mass. This was the reminder to me that God is the one in charge of this whole thing, and He knew that my desire to return to Mass was a higher priority than my desire to have a less crazy day. So He took charge, you know?

    Therefore, I will return to a piece of advice I give people often. List your options, and then do the next right thing. There are so many options for getting through high school, and you know most of them already. Make each year work the way you need it to work, taking into account what you can afford, what your kids want, and what they actually need. Then divide up your time accordingly.

    Three last things.
    1) Yes, there is no wiggle room in the schedule. There is no "down time." My to-do list never gets completely done any day at all. I force myself to have a lie-down each day because medically-speaking I need it. So it's not a luxury. Another new wrinkle in this year's routine but we are making it work. And I know how I feel when I skip it. Not good. So it's added to the priority list and not the nice-to-do list.

    2) My kids have had to learn to accept that their to-do list never gets completely done either. And I have come to realize that this is actually better training for real life than in their younger years when they do get every box checked every single day. When I was in high school, I pushed myself from dawn to the wee hours of the night every single day with honors classes, sports, and clubs. Not a very balanced life, and a skill I have had to learn in adulthood. These guys are learning it much earlier and personally I think it will be good for them.

    3) Helping them be more independent is actually good preparation for college. Not saying to pull back entirely and mimic our situation because that's not necessary for you guys. But having one child start college these last couple of weeks, and another start a community college math class, and both students have found the transition to be smooth and familiar. My son's teacher actually spent the first THREE WHOLE DAYS of class teaching how to study and succeed in the class. He was so surprised at the level of guidance the kids needed. But he's been working that way for years already. There's no hand-holding in college, so the more you can give your children a taste of that freedom in high school, the better prepared they will be.

    I hope this is helpful. It's not answering your questions specifically and it's a bit of a ramble, but it's what we have found to work for us thus far.
    AMDG,
    Sarah


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  • bean
    replied
    I was still mostly at the elbow for 7th grade, although dd had some health issues going on. Now for 9th, it's more of me scaffolding what goes into the planner, checking homework and giving tests. I am teaching dd's Rhetoric to a small group, so that's one day a week plus grading and planning. I joke I go to work in the afternoons to rest sometimes, and I only have one (very intense) kiddo at home.

    ETA- I stopped teaching math this year, just grading. It really has made our days go more smoothly. Dd is using Derek Owens self-checking for Precalculus and we see a tutor friend once a week who goes over the problems she has missed during the week. Also, in Indiana kids can email/ live chat their math and science homework questions to students at Rose Hulman if they get stuck. If you think your 7th grader using VideoText would work, definitely consider it.
    Last edited by bean; 09-07-2019, 05:33 AM.

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  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Mary,
    Have you asked each of the older two to make you a list prioritizing which subjects they want to do with you? It would be a request, not anything you could promise to honor. However, it would give you good feedback to use in your decisions. Also, it might help them realize that you can't be everywhere at once. I'm sure they know this but seeing it on paper might be helpful.
    Just a thought. Sorry to ignore all your very good direct questions!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs Bee
    replied
    No answers from me... I have the same problem with total mental exhaustion by late afternoon. As in, I need to hide somewhere and be by myself or I'll go crazy! I'm also generally starving at that time of day, and my patience supply is empty. I really feel like I hit my proverbial wall around 4:30pm. In a way, I suspect that having only three students made me miss lessons that mothers of bigger families learn quickly by necessity. I feel like I should be able to handle this, and yet I find teaching so intense that it really drains me, and we're not quite in high school yet! This year we're doing 2 MPOA classes (Middle School Science II and Classical Studies I), and I'm looking forward to Cindy Davis's name becoming famous in our house thanks to the Algebra videos: I love Algebra, but I'm curious to experiment with videos... I teach everything else (2 kids in 8th and one in K). I'm also very interested in the answers you get for #5!

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  • JodiSue
    replied

    For #1, yes, and yes. I tell my kids often, "There is only one of me and four of you. Someone has to wait." And they all get their turns and I drop dead asleep at 7:30 pm.

    My oldest is only in 7th, so grain of salt and all that, but I/we tend towards more independent work for the older two. I make liberal use of any DVDs (as in I let the DVDs teach where it's feasible) and discussion or reading together comes after they've completed a lesson or if they are having trouble or questions mid-lesson. So, for lit, they read, do the guide, bring it to me and we discuss each answer, discussion questions, and I have them read aloud to me if they miss key points or if they can't figure out a question on their own.

    I admit that it is not the ideal for me personally for the most robust education/discussion we could possibly be having, but also I have one guy up and motivated to work long before I get my first gulp of coffee so that he can finish school and work on his creative pursuits like developing Risk strategies and reading Redwall for the 345th time through. I am doing well if I keep up on checking his work in a timely fashion, haha. Plus, this strategy works well when tiny humans are growing and making me nauseated and couch-bound.

    DH is more well-read than I am and doesn't read the teacher guides, so I love having the more robust discussions at the dinner table when he is home and can add stuff I don't think of or didn't get to, and the kids love retelling him stuff about their school day.

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  • Mary
    started a topic Curious - how involved are you in teaching?

    Curious - how involved are you in teaching?

    I wasn't sure where to put this, as I'm talking about a 9th grader, 7th grader and a kiddo just switching over to SC (level 2). I hope the moderator(s) will move this if needed. :-)


    My 9th grader does VideoText math (love that they've partnered with MP!) and does ancient Greek and Latin translation classes online. Otherwise, I am teaching all other subjects according to the MP 9th grade core.

    Similarly, my 7th grader is taking Latin online and I am teaching all other MP 7th grade core subjects, subbing Novare Earth Science in for Trees/Tiner Biology.

    Lastly, my 8-year-old is following the SC Level 2 sequence.


    It goes without saying that my 8-year-old has a lot of "at elbow" time with me. This is not an issue.

    My older two like to round-robin read history, literature, logic, and science with me. I happen to really like these subjects and I enjoy reading and discussing with them. They are both very motivated kids and, without any prodding from me, get up early to work on Greek/Latin homework and review their science flashcards, etc. My 9th grader also does her VideoText math lessons solo during this time. I start my "office hours" for them between 8 and 9am, when I am finished with Little Sister. We work solidly together this time, breaking for lunch and taking short breaks for snacks, until 3 or 4pm daily. Some days, we might go a bit later, especially if I need to work a little longer with my 8-year-old. In the evenings, we still do read-alouds. We are tag-teaming "The Scarlet Pimpernel" and "Pride and Prejudice" - purely for enjoyment (mine included).

    Basically, my days involve me teaching my 8-year-old, then her going off to do her homework while I work with one of the Bigs. Then that Big goes off to write out his/her flashcards and/or homework while I work with the other Big...repeat forty-eleven times, with a few sessions of everyone together discussing/arguing/asking questions (literature is great for that). In between, the Little will come to show me completed work or to ask me to fire up the iron to fuse together her latest Perler bead creation. *weary laugh* The older kids do not need oversight or reminders with regard to homework, flashcards or projects (aside from some science experiments). When they go off to do work, I know they're working.

    I do not mind teaching my kids and I know how blessed I am to have children who: 1) enjoy learning and 2) enjoy being with their mother. *insert puffy cartoon hearts floating around my head -here-*
    However, I am exhausted. By the end of each day, I am physically and mentally spent...and then it's time to make dinner and do the dishes. (Thank God for the crock pot!)

    I have questions for Moms Who Have Been Here:

    1. Will this feeling of sheer exhaustion and mental overload begin to get better as the year progresses? That is, is what I'm feeling merely a case of First Week of School Overload?

    2. I am teaching ds12 prealgebra, which I can do well but I don't *love*. I am seriously thinking of just switching him over to VideoText, as well - especially since I already own the entire program. He is a math wiz and self-motivated. Do you see a problem with letting him be more autonomous with regard to math at this age/grade level?

    3. I am toying with breaking up some of the Concise History lessons so that my dd14 and I are not going blind reading several pages of 6 pt. type twice per week. I think we'd rather read fewer pages of 6-pt. type and go blind more slowly... *LOL* Do you see a problem with reading a few pages and answering a few questions each day rather than reading larger chunks/doing larger assignments fewer timesper week?

    4. I had begun reading through the Iliad with dd14 this summer and having her do the workbook/quizzes and tests, since she missed Iliad/Odyssey last year. We are about 1/3 finished. I am toying with switching this over to merely a read-along, with us tag-team reading and discussing. Do you think this is a bad idea?

    5. I love teaching Logic, but that would be the next logical (ha!) subject that might fall to independent study. Are Mr. Cothran's logic videos a good substitute for Mom standing at the white board lecturing and outlining key points? I took the class myself a few years ago but, admittedly, never cracked open the DVDs.

    6. Are there other things I'm overlooking here? Any suggestions, hints, tips you can think of that might help me stay involved with the kids (which they want) maintain my sanity?
    Last edited by Mary; 09-06-2019, 12:17 PM. Reason: Cleaned up spacing/formatting
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