Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Theology Ideas for Catholic HS

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Theology Ideas for Catholic HS

    Catholic families - What do you use for HS theology? I am trying to figure out something for next year. I will have a 9th grader, 10th grader, and 11th grader.

    They will be taking an intensive writing class with our local co-op. I will be doing MP history and literature. I want them to have a solid understanding of the Faith, but I don't want to overwhelm them with a lot of essays and written assignments because they will be doing a lot of that in their other classes.

    Any ideas? Advice?

    Thanks!

    Sarah

    #2
    A great combo of catechism, Scripture, church history and studying writings of saints and personal spiritual growth is the theology courses by Kolbe Academy. They are super intense though. A good, solid alternative that my dyslexic is loving is the Didache series. It doesn’t have all the primary resource documents and reading books by saints but it has beautifully taught theology. Kolbe is closer to college level while Didache is solidly middle road high school level. Both are great options.
    Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
    DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
    DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
    DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
    (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
    DS, 20, Physics major
    DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
    DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
    DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

    Comment


      #3
      Debbie- my oldest daughter (now in college) did the Kolbe class. I think it would be a bit too much for the others right now.

      I have heard about the Didache series but there seems to be a couple of different versions. Which do you recommend?

      Thanks!

      Sarah

      Comment


        #4
        We are using the original year long books. I felt they were more cohesive. Catholic theology one year, Scripture the next, Church History the next and morality last. My daughter does better focusing on one thing at a time. The semester books were written to conform to the new Bishops’ standards of what to teach each year. Still good, just a bit more scattered to me. A little bit of this and that each year. Same stuff is there just a different order I think. The parish versions are watered down shortened version for use in once a week youth groups.
        If you want short and sweet use the parish editions.
        if you want to pick a variety of topics each year use the semester editions.
        if you prefer to focus on one topic all year do the year long books.
        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
        (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
        DS, 20, Physics major
        DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
        DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
        DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

        Comment


          #5
          We use the Fr. Laux books - Chief Truths in 9th, Mass and the Sacraments in 10th, and the plan is Morality and Apologetics in 11th. I’ve used both Kolbe and Mother of Divine Grace plans (not entirely as written). 12th this year was Anne Carroll’s Following Christ in the World (published by Seton) with the Mother of Divine Grace syllabus. So far two have enjoyed Fr. Laux.

          I also have a tendency to add to the Fr. Laux. So, this year my freshman read The Creed in Slow Motion by Fr. Knox (highly recommend) and the first four parts of Fr. Vidmar’s the Catholic Church Through the Ages (roughly half or so of the book). Next year I’m planning Edward Sri’s Bibilcal Walk Through the Mass, the rest of Fr. Vidmar’s book, and a few saint books.
          Brit - Catholic homeschooling mom to 5 - 3 big boys ('01, '03, and '06), daughter ('10 - Down syndrome), and one more boy ('15 - always wound up, and non-stop movement and noise)

          Comment


            #6
            Sarah,
            I am going to agree with Debbie about using the Didache series, which is really well-done, but clarify her description a bit based on what I have learned about the difference between the versions. It is correct that the original semester-long books were changed to align with the USCCB's recommended path of high school catechesis. But they did not simply chop them up into random topics. What actually happened was three of the books - Understanding Sacred Scripture, Our Moral Life in Christ, and Church History, remain as independent books - they were simply condensed into books that could be covered in a semester. The semester version of these books are still an incredible amount of material to cover. The Church history book went from being something like 800 pages for the year long book, to close to 500 instead. In a semester. Geesh.

            But the other book, Introduction to Catholicism, contained the majority of Church doctrine on the essentials of the faith. This book alone was taken apart and greatly expanded. For example, the Intro to Cath book covered each of the Sacraments, yet when you compare the number of pages given to each Sacrament in that book with the coverage in the newer semester-long book, The Sacraments, there is twice as much content. This happens again and again for topics throughout the Intro to Cath book...the material was able to be covered in greater depth by giving them separate books. There are 11 semester-long books. Six of them are considered "essential," and are topics from that original Intro to Cath book plus Our Moral Life in Christ. The other five "electives" include the books on Scripture, and History, along with Social Justice, Ecumenism, and Vocations.

            Also, they have published a Confirmation prep book that is excellent as well.

            AMDG,
            Sarah
            Last edited by KF2000; 05-16-2019, 06:25 AM.
            2020-2021
            16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
            DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
            DS, 17
            DD, 15
            DD, 13
            DD, 11
            DD, 9
            DD, 7
            +DS+
            DS, 2

            Comment


              #7
              Sarah- that’s a very good description. Instead of spending one year on catechism they spend three or four semesters on it. Instead of spending a year on church history and a year on morality they spend a semester each. It broke the topics up differently with different emphasis.
              I looked at both and struggled to decide. The semester books are newer and meet the new standards. The year long books aren’t always as pretty (but the new edition of Intro to Catholicism is gorgeously produced) and don’t necessarily meet the bishops standards as to what is to be taught each year (since they were written before the standards). I had to look at my daughter. She thrives with MEmoria Press and the much not many approach. She does much better when she can spend time focusing on one thing instead of rushing here and there. She does better spending a year on a longer church history than doing 2/3 of it in 1/2 the time. A student who gobbles up information and ideas can end up getting more overall with the semester books. It wasn’t the best fit for my daughter.
              the reality is all three editions are good for different reasons. I might at first think the pariah edition isn’t good for a homeschool or school setting because it isn’t enough. But someone else might look at it and think it’s perfect to set the framework for exploring deeper with primary resources and original writing of the saints.
              I had spent a long time printing out TOC of both year and semester editions and looking at what was taught and how slow/deep/fast it went. For some the decision might even come down to which can I get easier/cheaper? They are both that good.
              Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
              DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
              DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
              DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
              (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
              DS, 20, Physics major
              DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
              DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
              DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                Sarah,
                I am going to agree with Debbie about using the Didache series, which is really well-done, but clarify her description a bit based on what I have learned about the difference between the versions. It is correct that the original semester-long books were changed to align with the USCCB's recommended path of high school catechesis. But they did not simply chop them up into random topics. What actually happened was three of the books - Understanding Sacred Scripture, Our Moral Life in Christ, and Church History, remain as independent books - they were simply condensed into books that could be covered in a semester. The semester version of these books are still an incredible amount of material to cover. The Church history book went from being something like 800 pages for the year long book, to close to 500 instead. In a semester. Geesh.

                But the other book, Introduction to Catholicism, contained the majority of Church doctrine on the essentials of the faith. This book alone was taken apart and greatly expanded. For example, the Intro to Cath book covered each of the Sacraments, yet when you compare the number of pages given to each Sacrament in that book with the coverage in the newer semester-long book, The Sacraments, there is twice as much content. This happens again and again for topics throughout the Intro to Cath book...the material was able to be covered in greater depth by giving them separate books. There are 11 semester-long books. Six of them are considered "essential," and are topics from that original Intro to Cath book plus Our Moral Life in Christ. The other five "electives" include the books on Scripture, and History, along with Social Justice, Ecumenism, and Vocations.

                Also, they have published a Confirmation prep book that is excellent as well.

                AMDG,
                Sarah
                My daughter will be starting 7th grade in the fall. So it sounds like we could do all 11 books plus the Confirmation book and that would cover junior high and high school. She will be confirmed next spring, so I would guess I would want to do Confirmation the first semester, but after that should we do the core subjects or the electives?
                JeJe Greer
                Mom to:
                Stella (8M with 9th grade literature, and writing)
                Clara (Combination of SC 5/6 and 4th New User)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Debbie,
                  Exactly. They are just different...and will suit different groups for different purposes.

                  Jeje,
                  My plan for my kids is to use the Understanding the Scriptures book as a 7th grade text, and the Confirmation text for 8th grade. During those two years I also want them to do a thorough review of the Baltimore Catechism, so I schedule that along the way too. When they get to high school, I am having them do two books a year, plus outside readings. It's on my summer project list to get those scheduled for my two high schoolers for next year.

                  Also, we have used Homeschool Connections for high school Theology and been very pleased. They have unique and interesting topics for many of their classes, and the teachers have been (mostly) excellent. (There was one teacher who was theologically fine, but had her own unique system for teaching that did not resonate with my daughter.) I know they are working on adding classes for the Didache books as well.

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah
                  2020-2021
                  16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                  DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                  DS, 17
                  DD, 15
                  DD, 13
                  DD, 11
                  DD, 9
                  DD, 7
                  +DS+
                  DS, 2

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                    Debbie,
                    Exactly. They are just different...and will suit different groups for different purposes.

                    Jeje,
                    My plan for my kids is to use the Understanding the Scriptures book as a 7th grade text, and the Confirmation text for 8th grade. During those two years I also want them to do a thorough review of the Baltimore Catechism, so I schedule that along the way too. When they get to high school, I am having them do two books a year, plus outside readings. It's on my summer project list to get those scheduled for my two high schoolers for next year.

                    Also, we have used Homeschool Connections for high school Theology and been very pleased. They have unique and interesting topics for many of their classes, and the teachers have been (mostly) excellent. (There was one teacher who was theologically fine, but had her own unique system for teaching that did not resonate with my daughter.) I know they are working on adding classes for the Didache books as well.

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    I will look at Homeschool Connections, too, but I have heard of the Didache series for awhile. I looked at the samples and it seems that I could do Confirmation in one semester (she will also be getting stuff from the Denver Archdiocese once a week at youth group), and then I could do Understanding the Scriptures. I am a bit concerned that there is no homeschool lesson plan for these. I have a tendency to get very behind when I do not follow a lesson plan. I also looked at the Kolbe curriculum and it seems overwhelming, plus I do not see a Confirmation course. Do you happen to know if anyone has put together a homeschool lesson plan for the Didache series books other than by enrolling in Seton Theology?
                    JeJe Greer
                    Mom to:
                    Stella (8M with 9th grade literature, and writing)
                    Clara (Combination of SC 5/6 and 4th New User)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Catechismclass.com has homeschool courses and sacramental prep. Another option you may want to consider.
                      Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys, teacher at St. Dominic Latin (FFL, TFL, 4FL, Traditional Logic 1&2), Memoria College student

                      2021-2022
                      9th grade - a mix of MPOA, Vita Beata, Lukeion, and AOPS
                      8th grade - 8M with modifications
                      4th grade - 4A

                      "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I don’t know of a homeschool lesson plan for Didache, but the TG for Intro Catholicism has a very clearly laid out lesson plan of what to read each day and what questions to do and when to test as well as long term projects scheduled. It’s not as easy to use as MP lesson plans, but it certainly gives you information on how to pace the course. When I looked at the Understanding Scriptures book we are doing next year, it wasn’t quite as nicely laid out as far as saying which questions go with which page read but it still looked very helpful for creating your own lesson plans. At least it’s something to get you started making plans.
                        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
                        DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
                        DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
                        DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
                        (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
                        DS, 20, Physics major
                        DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
                        DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
                        DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Nerdmom View Post
                          Catechismclass.com has homeschool courses and sacramental prep. Another option you may want to consider.
                          This looks interesting. I had not heard of it before. I am trying to figure out from the website whether the classes are recordings of lectures or if the kids simply read the lessons themselves. Do you know?

                          Thanks!

                          Sarah

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by sarahmccb View Post

                            This looks interesting. I had not heard of it before. I am trying to figure out from the website whether the classes are recordings of lectures or if the kids simply read the lessons themselves. Do you know?

                            Thanks!

                            Sarah
                            We used it when our were pretty little, and they still aren't in high school. There are no lectures (at least in the grades we used). You read the material, read about the saint of the day (from catholicculture.com), and there is a quiz at the end. It served us well in a very busy time of life. I haven't used the high school courses, so I can't really vouch for them, but it is another option to explore.

                            Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys, teacher at St. Dominic Latin (FFL, TFL, 4FL, Traditional Logic 1&2), Memoria College student

                            2021-2022
                            9th grade - a mix of MPOA, Vita Beata, Lukeion, and AOPS
                            8th grade - 8M with modifications
                            4th grade - 4A

                            "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                              Debbie,
                              Exactly. They are just different...and will suit different groups for different purposes.

                              Jeje,
                              My plan for my kids is to use the Understanding the Scriptures book as a 7th grade text, and the Confirmation text for 8th grade. During those two years I also want them to do a thorough review of the Baltimore Catechism, so I schedule that along the way too. When they get to high school, I am having them do two books a year, plus outside readings. It's on my summer project list to get those scheduled for my two high schoolers for next year.

                              Also, we have used Homeschool Connections for high school Theology and been very pleased. They have unique and interesting topics for many of their classes, and the teachers have been (mostly) excellent. (There was one teacher who was theologically fine, but had her own unique system for teaching that did not resonate with my daughter.) I know they are working on adding classes for the Didache books as well.

                              AMDG,
                              Sarah
                              I had not considered starting the Didache series in middle school, but I do like the series, so that is an idea. Am I understanding that you plan to use the full year scripture book in 7th, and then use the semester courses in HS? I noticed two of the core courses in the semester series were written by Scott Hahn. I had assumed that was the same material as was contained in the complete course. Is it not or did I misunderstand your plan?

                              My oldest did the Homeschool Connections live course for the Intro Didache, and the instructor was great. Unfortunately, they are not offering any live Didache courses this year because neither instructor is available. I do believe they have all the courses recorded. Oldest will take the HSC scripture course with the Laux book next year, and I'm hoping the Didache instructors will return for the next year. My oldest needs deadlines, so she has to do live.

                              DD 16 | 11th
                              DS 14 | 8th
                              DD 12 | 7A

                              12th Year HSing, 8th Year MP

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X