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Can you share a sample daily/weekly schedule for your high schoolers?

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    Can you share a sample daily/weekly schedule for your high schoolers?

    We're in a bit of a rut schedule-wise for my high schoolers (9th grade, 14 and 15yo boys). They have three online classes (Latin, pre-algebra, Ref/Con) and three co-op classes (MP9 Lit, Medieval History [CTP], and Novare Intro to Physics). They have CCD on Sundays, co-op meets on Mondays. Youth group, church potluck, and a project club are each once a month. One of them is writing a book and enjoys art, the other does woodworking and graphic design, and has a job working as a subcontractor for our business. His job takes about 20 hours per week.

    They are both wanting to join Civil Air Patrol, the older one wants to turn his woodworking into another job (selling through a local home decor boutique), they want to increase the number of projects they're doing for project club, etc. But every time they do more than the norm, they end up exhausted, moody, and absolute bears (there are some life-long mood/sensory-overload issues involved).

    In addition, one of them is struggling academically, the stronger one academics-wise is also facing some challenges with high school level work.

    When I try to give more structure to their school day, I am told that they know what they're doing and don't need a daily breakdown.

    Can you guys share how your high schoolers are structuring their days so I can figure this out without it being "just mom"?
    Jennifer


    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

    #2
    I do not have any particular advice..more just sharing how it happens here..

    My guy struggles with just getting the "norm" done. He has a very hard time with time management and focus. This year, he attends a classical school 3 days a week which has helped him be a bit more organized, but has been quite a bit more stressful on his sweet heart, so he is coming home next year. I had a meeting with his school a couple of weeks ago and it was recommended that on his "home-work" days, he stays with the school schedule. So no sleeping in and starting when he decides. At 8:45, he needs to be starting his first subject, just like at school. At the next class period, the next subject, etc.. Break for lunch and recess, and right back to it. School is over at 2:55. Kids like my son (and one of my daughters), NEED the predictability of schedules. If they are left to decide when and what order they complete their work, their day lacks efficiency and seems to drag on and on which robs him of his well deserved free time.

    My son is 14, almost 15, and I'd love to give him the independence he desires, but right now, he is just not ready to handle the responsibility of creating his own schedule and sticking to it. He knows this. He truly desires to complete his work and do it well, but left to his own time management, it just doesn't happen..which causes him self disappointment. So, I have to be diligent in sticking with the schedule too. It has been quite a work for me to stick to it, but well worth it. Attitudes are better, and we all do have more free time and aren't working into the evening. (most days )

    One last thing..I bought a Time Timer a couple of weeks ago, It has helped us stay on track and keep moving. It was very stressful at first because my kids would see the time disappearing and freak out, but then I told them this timer was for ME to help us stay on a schedule and it lessened the anxiety.

    You likely know all this, just sharing what it looks like here for my guy
    Katie

    2018/2019 5th year with MP
    DS 9th, DD 6th, DD 2nd: attending a classical prep school 3 days/week using mostly MP.
    Twin DD's 6: home with me and loving MPK!

    Comment


      #3
      Jen,

      A couple things come to mind. I only have one high school student so take it with a grain of salt.

      Daily plans....I make a daily plan, I even consult with my mom (she lives a mile away). Sometimes I write it down, sometimes it is just in my head, but it still happens. At their age, I sincerely doubt that have it covered without any help. I am still working on my daughter who is a sophomore on this as well. She works hard, but needs help working more effectively. Interestingly, I just saw this blog post today from her Greek teacher....very timely ;-)
      https://sassyperi.blogspot.com/2019/...out-daily.html


      My daughter’s schedule....
      5:30-7:00. Swim (not Wednesday)
      7-8. Shower, dressed, breakfast
      8-9 piano practice (except Monday, she has class at this time and a lesson in the afternoon)
      She has 5 online classes plus Delectare - Rhetoric, Short Novel, Biology(2xweek), Greek 3, Latin 3, Aeneid
      Algebra 2 she does independently and she has choir one afternoon. Christian Studies usually ends up as a summer subject.
      Schoolwork usually takes her until about 4:00/5:00, but she works some after dinner and always works some on the weekends. Two language translation classes will do that to you, but it was her choice.
      She is usually in bed by 8/8:30. She is very protective of her bedtime.

      extracurricular activities...she usually volunteers an hour or two once a week at the library and is very involved in American Heritage Girls.

      I have heard very good things about Civil Air Patrol. The “local” unit would be at least an hour drive each way so it hasn’t been a consideration for my boys. I only looked it up when a couple of siblings of a girl in AHG were involved. We also had a lady in CAP teach flag ceremonies to our older AHG girls this fall. My concern is that your boys have too much on their plate even without it. I know some people are successful working during college, but I think fewer are successful doing so during high school especially as freshman. For college students I have seen it discussed that up to 15 hours per week actually helps, but above that is detrimental to academic performance. A high school freshman is worlds away from a college student. My daughter dropped violin when she hit high school because she simply didn’t have time to do both violin and piano well. I think it was harder on me since she started at 4. Life is full of choices. Not every stage of life looks the same. Most of the things they want to do are very good, but they need to understand and articulate their goals and prioritize what is most important to them and blend it in with what is most important to you. Just because they don’t have time now, doesn’t mean they will never have time.

      good luck on all of this...parenting sure is tough! Remember the days when we thought we were doing great when got them potty trained and sleeping through the night??


      Dorinda

      DD 15 - 10th with MPOA(Biology, Novel, Material Logic/Rhetoric ), Lukeion (Greek3, Latin 3)
      DS 13 - 8A with MPOA(Third Form and composition)
      DS 10 - 5M
      DS 5 - K with AAR3

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Jen,

        My first thought was that your boys already have a lot on their plate, and Civil Air Patrol will probably be too time-consuming. Working 20 hours a week sounds like a lot, especially since he's struggling academically.

        We have struggled over the years to help my son with time management. I think most kids need help with learning how to make a realistic schedule and stick to it. My son (15) has resisted a mom-imposed schedule, so I have to have him involved in the planning. It has helped him to be reminded that MOST teens do not manage their studies on their own. Most go to school and have to stick to a class schedule. This year, I had my son write out what he thought would be a realistic schedule for himself that included the amount of sleep he needs, the subjects we agreed he would have this year, and daily prayer, exercise, and relaxation time. This is what we came up with together:

        6:30am--wake up, get dressed, read Mass readings, pray
        7:00am--set the table
        7:15am--breakfast
        8:00am--morning offering with family, start school
        8:15-9am--Composition
        9-10:15am--Third Form Latin & NLE prep
        10:15-10:30am--Snack & break outside
        10:30-11:15am--Algebra 1
        11:15-11:45am--Go running with sibling
        11:45-12:30pm--Algebra 1
        12:30-1:15pm--Lunch & computer break
        1:15-2:15pm--Biology (homework for outside class)
        2:15-3:15pm--Literature or Religion (alternating days)
        3:15-3:30pm--Study lines for outside drama class
        3:30pm--Finished/ free time for hobbies
        5:30pm--Evening chores
        6-9pm--Dinner, Shower, Family time
        In bed by 9pm.

        One day a week he's out the whole day for the two outside classes. One evening a week he goes to a mentoring/study program and gets some more homework done.

        It's taken a lot of accountability with Dad, but he basically keeps this schedule himself now, with some prompting from me. He wears a watch and sometimes sets an alarm for himself to remember to switch subjects. It's posted at his desk, and he checks in weekly with Dad to make sure he's staying on track. He will lose the computer if he deviates wildly from this, but I don't watch over it constantly.

        We had to drop a couple subjects I wanted him to do to make this work, as well as his desire to start a landscaping business. He has opportunities over the summer to work on landscaping, and a couple times during the year he gets a request to do some work at my husband's work place, in which case I let him skip a day of school to do that (if he catches up the work for the outside classes in the evening).

        It is hard to balance everything! I hope you can work out something that they can be happy with.

        Catherine

        2018-19
        DS15, 9th
        DS13, 6th
        DS11, 5th
        DD11, 5th
        DS6, K
        DD3
        DS 10 mos

        Homeschooling 3 with MP
        2 using First Form series in school

        Comment


          #5
          Hi Jen!
          I am going to break out of the mold...and say CAP might actually be a blessing for you guys. We have some close friends who have had two of their teens do it so far, and it has been great. They learn a lot about structure, discipline, and meeting expectations - which is always good for teens! I was SO tempted to put my boy in it, but he is not a strong runner because of how his thigh bone works into his knee...it's what made him give up soccer. So he probably could not have done the physical component. But their kids loved it...even the younger sibling who got "dragged" into it by the older sibling!

          My take on it is that you make time for the things that you think are most valuable for your kids at each stage of their lives. Sometimes you get surprised by what they need at different stages because it's not what you expected. But once it's there, you can't just ignore it. For instance, your boys sound like they have a lot of interests, a lot of plans, a lot of ideas. I personally think that is pretty normal for this age. They do not really know yet WHAT is their key passion, so all their ideas seem like really big deals...until they aren't. I think you need to have one of those "come to Jesus" moments when you talk about what they really want/need and why, to help narrow down their options. It may turn out that doing ONE bigger thing, like CAP, might cover a lot of the interests/needs that they have. And then they may be able to see that all these random projects are really just time-fillers because they needed something more concrete, more challenging to which they could devote their energy and attention.

          My experience with teens thus far is that they are each desperate to have a dominant interest. Once they find that dominant interest, they are willing to do everything else they need to in order to be able to continue that dominant interest. I have an artist and a musician, thus far. They both are great, well-rounded kids, but they have found what they love and it brings a sense of contentment. They definitely have side-interests as well (baking and cars, respectively) but their certainty about there main interests has never really wavered. My third seems to love horses, which is actually quite perfect for her but is a whole nother level of expense, poor thing. We are still wondering how God is going to deal with THAT one!

          My point is, sometimes you need to help them focus on ONE thing, so that they can really see what is their key interest. That will help them filter out the dross and come up with the motivation to get through their days to be able to do what they love. I actually didn't jump on this question at first because I didn't have anything I could offer - I really don't know what my teens' daily schedules are. I peek my head in at them, and we talk a lot during the day, but as far as what they do and when - I really don't know! But they both get their work done, they are soon both going to be working, and they both make time for their passions. (and they go to youth group, and do service projects, and play with their siblings, and go with me for errands from time to time, etc.)

          I don't know if this helps you at all or not, but I just wanted to put a vote in for trying the CAP because I have seen it do great things for kids that were otherwise kind of "unengaged," if you know what I mean!

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2018-2019
          DD 18 - 12th || DS 15 - 10th || DD 13 - 8th || DD 11 - 6th || DD 9 - 4th
          DD 7 - 1st || DD 5 - mix of 1st & JrK || +DS, 2-21-16+ || DS 14 months

          Comment


            #6
            For my independent kiddo, I made him a two-tiered schedule. Perhaps something like this could be useful for your boys.

            The top half of the schedule has subjects that have both a minimum todo list and a minimum amount of time. Latin, Math, violin each get an hour minimum daily. If they finish their todo list early, they must finish the hour with other review/practice. These subjects must be done first, generally all by lunch.

            The bottom half of the schedule has todo list items. 2 paragraphs for Chreia, 1 lesson lit guides, etc. I don't care what order he does them in or if they take 20 minutes or 2 hours, but they have to be done before fun stuff happens.


            ​This seems to be a good balance for him of structure and freedom. On days that have interruptions/change in schedule, the bottom half only is negotiable.


            Amanda
            Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

            "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Nerdmom View Post
              For my independent kiddo, I made him a two-tiered schedule. Perhaps something like this could be useful for your boys.

              The top half of the schedule has subjects that have both a minimum todo list and a minimum amount of time. Latin, Math, violin each get an hour minimum daily. If they finish their todo list early, they must finish the hour with other review/practice. These subjects must be done first, generally all by lunch.

              The bottom half of the schedule has todo list items. 2 paragraphs for Chreia, 1 lesson lit guides, etc. I don't care what order he does them in or if they take 20 minutes or 2 hours, but they have to be done before fun stuff happens.


              This seems to be a good balance for him of structure and freedom. On days that have interruptions/change in schedule, the bottom half only is negotiable.

              I would love to see some screenshots of what this might look like.
              Cathy aka The Attached Mama
              2018-2019
              DS 12, 6th Grade---MP 5M, IEW, Spelling Plus, AOPS Pre-Algebra, MathCounts, Kolbe Physical Science, Speech Team
              DD 10, 5th Grade---MP 4M, IEW, Latina Christiana (two-year pace), Spelling Plus, AOPS Pre-Algebra, MathCounts, Elemental Biology II, Speech Team
              DS 4 (almost 5)--MP Junior kindergarten, Myself and Others, "I See Sam" Readers, Singapore/Rightstart Math
              (Now we will watch as I start subtracting subjects off my signature. ha!)

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by TheAttachedMama View Post
                I would love to see some screenshots of what this might look like.
                Does this help?
                Attached Files
                Amanda
                Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

                "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                Comment


                  #9
                  Another kiddo's schedule attached.
                  I type in any changes and print it out at the beginning of the week. Then they can fill in the boxes as they finish the work. I have to grade all work before they are free to play
                  Attached Files
                  Amanda
                  Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

                  "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you everyone...it's been crazy this week so I haven't been able to respond but I've been reading and re-reading your posts. My son sincerely believes school shouldn't take more than 4 or 4-1/2 hours (including a 1-1/2 hour online class) so this is going to take some convincing and enforcement on our part.
                    Jennifer


                    2018-2019
                    DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                    DS-12 (6M)
                    DS-10 (SC3)
                    DD-8 (MP2)
                    DD-6 (SC2)
                    DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                      Thank you everyone...it's been crazy this week so I haven't been able to respond but I've been reading and re-reading your posts. My son sincerely believes school shouldn't take more than 4 or 4-1/2 hours (including a 1-1/2 hour online class) so this is going to take some convincing and enforcement on our part.
                      I can really relate to this, Jen. We started MP when my son was in 7th grade, and that was when we began doing subjects after lunch besides reading books. This was a big shock to my son then, and almost three years later, he still struggles with it. He will still complain occasionally that it is unfair that his younger siblings finish school before him.

                      Some ways we’ve dealt with this are showing him a typical schedule from a public high school and from a rigorous private high school. We did this carefully because he was sensitive to being told he wasn't doing enough. We had a series of conversations about the importance of pursuing a classical education even when it's difficult--he could probably slide by in a public high school and get decent grades. If he completed an "easier" high school curriculum he would have more time for hobbies. And yes, there are homeschoolers and privately educated teens who complete a rigorous classical curriculum and have time for work and hobbies. This is awesome! Those students do not struggle with executive function to the extent our son does. We said that very straightforwardly--you are very intelligent, but you have some specific weaknesses that we have to work around and buttress. But, if we dedicate your teen years to a classical education, there will be a whole lifetime for hobbies with a greater capacity for enjoyment and lifelong learning because of your classical education. We got him on board with the struggle in this way. Of course he also has to have some free time, which is why we have a reduced class load, among other things.

                      It's such a delicate balance with kids who are emotionally immature but extremely sensitive to being treated that way and very intelligent but in need of so much structure and support to reach their full potential that they can feel we don't think they are very smart. I know you all are still sorting everything out. I am praying for you and your son!
                      Catherine

                      2018-19
                      DS15, 9th
                      DS13, 6th
                      DS11, 5th
                      DD11, 5th
                      DS6, K
                      DD3
                      DS 10 mos

                      Homeschooling 3 with MP
                      2 using First Form series in school

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by CatherineS View Post

                        I can really relate to this, Jen. We started MP when my son was in 7th grade, and that was when we began doing subjects after lunch besides reading books. This was a big shock to my son then, and almost three years later, he still struggles with it. He will still complain occasionally that it is unfair that his younger siblings finish school before him.

                        Some ways we’ve dealt with this are showing him a typical schedule from a public high school and from a rigorous private high school. We did this carefully because he was sensitive to being told he wasn't doing enough. We had a series of conversations about the importance of pursuing a classical education even when it's difficult--he could probably slide by in a public high school and get decent grades. If he completed an "easier" high school curriculum he would have more time for hobbies. And yes, there are homeschoolers and privately educated teens who complete a rigorous classical curriculum and have time for work and hobbies. This is awesome! Those students do not struggle with executive function to the extent our son does. We said that very straightforwardly--you are very intelligent, but you have some specific weaknesses that we have to work around and buttress. But, if we dedicate your teen years to a classical education, there will be a whole lifetime for hobbies with a greater capacity for enjoyment and lifelong learning because of your classical education. We got him on board with the struggle in this way. Of course he also has to have some free time, which is why we have a reduced class load, among other things.

                        It's such a delicate balance with kids who are emotionally immature but extremely sensitive to being treated that way and very intelligent but in need of so much structure and support to reach their full potential that they can feel we don't think they are very smart. I know you all are still sorting everything out. I am praying for you and your son!
                        I always love your posts Catherine and find them so ministering, encouraging, and helpful all at the same time! Even though I know there are diagnostic differences, it sounds like our boys are largely cut from the same cloth. You've described him to a T. He knows he has to work harder than others (even his younger brother who is in the same grade) but yes, he feels like he's not capable — even when we try to focus on what he's done well and then look at what we need to work on. And the end result is that he just wants to give up trying. Thank you so much for sharing how you addressed things. I'm definitely going to be doing this.
                        Jennifer


                        2018-2019
                        DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                        DS-12 (6M)
                        DS-10 (SC3)
                        DD-8 (MP2)
                        DD-6 (SC2)
                        DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Jen, I'm so glad it was helpful. :-)
                          Catherine

                          2018-19
                          DS15, 9th
                          DS13, 6th
                          DS11, 5th
                          DD11, 5th
                          DS6, K
                          DD3
                          DS 10 mos

                          Homeschooling 3 with MP
                          2 using First Form series in school

                          Comment

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