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    Intro to Physics

    My boys have had a hard time getting a good study groove going for Novare’s IP and I’ve been so busy with my younger students that I haven’t been able to give much support (one of them in particular needs extra support in academics). They’re not ready for the quizzes most weeks. I didn’t have them take the quizzes during the first semester, giving only the Fall Exam. One got an A, the other failed. We started quizzes for Spring semester but those aren’t going well. I’m sitting down to get a plan in place based on Novare’s recommended study sequence. They do the weekly review guide but are hit/miss on the objectives lists which are critical for the quizzes.

    Anyway, I know what we need to do on the study side of things, but my question is: if I drop the quizzes from their grades, will I then need to call this a “modified” course on transcripts or do I just view it as “we homeschool so modifications are assumed” since that’s part of the point of homeschooling — meeting each where they’re at. They are doing labs with the course.

    ETA: for clarification, I mean no longer taking quizzes, forgetting quizzes they did take, and only basing the grade on the labs, Fall Exam, and Spring Exam
    Last edited by jen1134; 03-01-2019, 11:30 AM.
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    2019-2020 Plans:

    DS16
    MP10 Lit, MP-Holt Biology, Light to the Nations II, Spanish
    MPOA: Algebra I, High School Comp II

    DS15
    As above, plus:
    MP Greek Tragedies; no Spanish
    MPOA: Fourth Form Latin

    DS12: 7M subbing Sea to Shining Sea for American history

    DS11: Simply Classical Level 4

    DD9: 3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

    DD7/8: Simply Classical Level 3

    DD 4/5: Simply Classical Level C (NT using SC for two-year PreK due to January birthday)

    #2
    I'm going to message you with an idea.
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
    D · 8th
    D · 5th
    S · 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
      I'm going to message you with an idea.
      Thank you! Just replied
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      2019-2020 Plans:

      DS16
      MP10 Lit, MP-Holt Biology, Light to the Nations II, Spanish
      MPOA: Algebra I, High School Comp II

      DS15
      As above, plus:
      MP Greek Tragedies; no Spanish
      MPOA: Fourth Form Latin

      DS12: 7M subbing Sea to Shining Sea for American history

      DS11: Simply Classical Level 4

      DD9: 3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

      DD7/8: Simply Classical Level 3

      DD 4/5: Simply Classical Level C (NT using SC for two-year PreK due to January birthday)

      Comment


        #4
        Here’s what we do: My daughter usually does fine on the math part of the quizzes but horribly on the written answers. I’ve started previewing the quizzes and marking “open book” on the new questions or old questions that we didn’t stress. Then when I grade, I write in the “best” answer. She then has that to study for further. The important questions show up over and over and prepare the student for the semester tests. Then I make sure to stress what to know for the tests. That worked well for the first semester tests. We are still in second semester. I will assign her grade based on thinking of the quizzes as homework. I don’t mark off for questions she hasn’t seen on a quiz before but will mark off for the biggie questions she really should know by then. My goal is for her to really master the material not to stump her on quizzes. I like how questions keep popping up over and over (but usually in a slightly different form) so she fully masters them.
        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 21, chemistry major
        DS, 18, Physics major
        DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
        DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
        DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

        Comment


          #5
          For high school, it would be unusual to base a report card grade on only labs and two exams. When I teach high school chemistry, which is lab heavy, I assign 20% or less of the students' grades on lab work (usually 15%). Even when I have taught in B&M schools, that is about as high as I can assign.

          So, where else can you legitimately give credit? Here are some ideas:

          1. Oral quizzes for part of the work. This might end up looking like "mastery review" that you do with your younger students to help them retain. It adds more work to your plate, but then you have the answer key in front of you. It's a matter of getting the student to review and retain.

          2. Use my "50% back" quiz grading system. I use this A LOT with struggling students. It works like this: the student studies for the quiz, then takes it in pencil, doing his best. I then grade the quiz, marking only as correct or incorrect. For incorrect answers, the student can gain back 50% of the points by looking up the answers (open book) while writing in BLUE PEN (so the corrected answers are obvious). I then re-grade the quiz and add back 50% of the points for correctly "corrected" answers. This helps a student not only on the point side, but also to gain knowledge.

          3. Create a "participation" category (usually 10%) and use it. Have your student explain the lesson to his father, sibs, etc. I'm sure you can be creative here.

          4. Have him do a "semester project" for points. I have no idea what that would look like. Just throwing it out there.



          Hope that helped a bit.




          Jen
          DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

          DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

          DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

          DS, 11 yrs, 6M: complete!

          All homeschooled.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post
            For high school, it would be unusual to base a report card grade on only labs and two exams. When I teach high school chemistry, which is lab heavy, I assign 20% or less of the students' grades on lab work (usually 15%). Even when I have taught in B&M schools, that is about as high as I can assign.

            So, where else can you legitimately give credit? Here are some ideas:

            1. Oral quizzes for part of the work. This might end up looking like "mastery review" that you do with your younger students to help them retain. It adds more work to your plate, but then you have the answer key in front of you. It's a matter of getting the student to review and retain.

            2. Use my "50% back" quiz grading system. I use this A LOT with struggling students. It works like this: the student studies for the quiz, then takes it in pencil, doing his best. I then grade the quiz, marking only as correct or incorrect. For incorrect answers, the student can gain back 50% of the points by looking up the answers (open book) while writing in BLUE PEN (so the corrected answers are obvious). I then re-grade the quiz and add back 50% of the points for correctly "corrected" answers. This helps a student not only on the point side, but also to gain knowledge.

            3. Create a "participation" category (usually 10%) and use it. Have your student explain the lesson to his father, sibs, etc. I'm sure you can be creative here.

            4. Have him do a "semester project" for points. I have no idea what that would look like. Just throwing it out there.



            Hope that helped a bit.




            Jen
            Another place you can legitimately give credit is a homework credit for completing the Questions and Exercises at the end of the chapter. I require my students to show all their work, units, etc. These points are relatively "easy" to earn, because they have the book, notes, and can ask me questions about problems that stump them. The quiz scores tend to be lower, but as momgineer said, the questions are repeated often enough that they master them over time. I always make my students complete the study guide - that is 5 easy homework points. The study guide requires them to review old quizzes. I like Jen (formerly)'s idea of the 50% back. I generally mark the questions they missed, but they have to find the correct answer in their book or notes. I don't give 50% back, but they have the correct answer to study for future quizzes. For a struggling student, I might let them earn the 50% back, which helps motivate them to find the answer.
            Cindy Davis
            Science and Math teacher at Highlands Latin School - Indianapolis
            ds-25 college graduate: autodidact, working to pay the bills
            ds-23 college graduate: 1st year med school
            dd-21 college senior: Nursing

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Cindy in Indy View Post

              Another place you can legitimately give credit is a homework credit for completing the Questions and Exercises at the end of the chapter. I require my students to show all their work, units, etc. These points are relatively "easy" to earn, because they have the book, notes, and can ask me questions about problems that stump them. The quiz scores tend to be lower, but as momgineer said, the questions are repeated often enough that they master them over time. I always make my students complete the study guide - that is 5 easy homework points. The study guide requires them to review old quizzes. I like Jen (formerly)'s idea of the 50% back. I generally mark the questions they missed, but they have to find the correct answer in their book or notes. I don't give 50% back, but they have the correct answer to study for future quizzes. For a struggling student, I might let them earn the 50% back, which helps motivate them to find the answer.
              Smacking head. Yep, HW points and study guide. I always had that component in my classroom for some easy points.

              I think my brain is becoming unraveled trying to think like both a homeschool mom and a high school science teacher simultaneously.

              BTW, the 50% back strategy was GOLD when I taught at small hybrid two day a week classical academy (Latin I and II in fact). The families were homeschooling, but wanted the accountability to an outside school. The high schoolers in my classes were largely 9th or 10th graders and were still on a steep learning curve for how to manage self study and outside expectations for quality work.



              Jen
              DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

              DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

              DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

              DS, 11 yrs, 6M: complete!

              All homeschooled.

              Comment

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