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(Sort of) OT: Have you used any of the high school courses for your self education?

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  • (Sort of) OT: Have you used any of the high school courses for your self education?

    I would love to hear anyone's responses, thoughts, opinions, experiences, etc.

  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Mary View Post
    Does MP have any plans to try this again? And would anyone here be interested?
    Good morning Mary,

    I checked with Scott and he would like to try offering this class again at some point. It was only the lack of enrollments that forced MPOA to cancel last time.

    HTH!

    Leave a comment:


  • Runner
    replied
    Originally posted by Mary View Post
    Oh, dear - those time zones can really put a damper on classes. My dd is currently taking an online class with a student from Australia. That poor girl gets up at 4am to attend!

    Then again, I'm also still muddling through How to Read a Book. I guess I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer.
    gosh! I admire her commitment!

    How to read a Book!
    Well I’m glad it’s not just me! I CANNOT get though that book. I don’t know what it is but it just doesn’t work for me. When I started on this journey to educate myself, I started with The Well Educated Mind....and How to Read A Book. What a disaster! Well Educated Mind started with Don Quixote, apparently a fun comic book. I didn’t get far, it’s a dreadful tale of people horribly abusing a poor chap with mental health issues!

    And How to Read A Book was my next attempt, and that was a disaster too, I just cannot get through it (I know, it’s down to will, but when you find yourself scrubbing the outside dunny instead of reading it, you know it’s not working for you !?)

    However, I am loving Plutarch, so that is good for my confidence. For each Life, I read the Famous Men of Greece version, and also the appropriate section in Dorothy Mills Greece book, and then read Plutarch. And I am getting there with memorisation. I have never really memorised anything formally, but I now know Invictus, Psalm 121, and I am working on Abu Ben Adlem. So maybe we are just out of practice......and maybe some books just take a lot of reading!

    But the journey is fun. And I have half an hour to spare so I shall get off the Internet and go and review the words from the first lesson of First Form Latin!

    Runner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mary
    replied
    Oh, dear - those time zones can really put a damper on classes. My dd is currently taking an online class with a student from Australia. That poor girl gets up at 4am to attend!

    You are so right. When also trying to homeschool and stay on top of the activities of daily living, it is really difficult to find time to take a class and do it well. When you do have time, the Logic series is a really good one. I found it to be much more approachable than, say, the Elements of Argument; however, much more mature than the Art of Argument series or books like The Fallacy Detective.
    I wouldn't bother with the latter two; however, Elements of Argument is a worthy read, especially once you've completed the MP Logic series. It's just taking me for-e-ver to muddle through it. Then again, I'm also still muddling through How to Read a Book. I guess I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Runner
    replied
    Originally posted by Mary View Post


    I did Logic I and II myself a few years ago. I bought the entire sets because I had never taken a logic course and I wanted to know more about it. (My husband was a member of the Philodemic Society and is Mister Logic around here - I secretly just wanted to win a friendly argument at the dinner table, just once!) I really, truly enjoyed it and had no trouble keeping up or understanding the material. The best part? I can hold my own with my husband as we debate certain issues. *Yesss!*

    On a slightly related topic, I had registered to take the adult classics course offered by MP this past fall. We were supposed to read the Iliad, Oddyssey, Aeneid, Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Sadly, there was not enough interest and the course was canceled. I still have all of my books and workbooks but I'm afraid to attempt this solo. Does MP have any plans to try this again? And would anyone here be interested?
    I am glad to hear how Logic went for you, I am excited to try it for myself, but I am getting rather a lot of things on the go at the moment, and so I am not doing them properly, and am afraid to bring too much else into the mix. Greeks myths, The story of the Greeks, Greek alphabet, my own Greek geography, Online grammar (KISS) learning time tables, First Form Latin (just 1 lesson in and realising I need to allocate more time to this) Plutarch Greek lives (Not for kids! Goodness, what those ancient Greeks got up to!) I did buy Logic 1 though and it is on the shelf looking at me ?. Logic is one of the few bits of MP I can actually buy here in NZ.

    Adult classes, that sounds wonderful! I would have 2 snags, the first, the usual, cost. I don’t mind paying for quality and MP certainly has that, but cost is a consideration. And, probably more pertinent, time. Not my time, the worlds time. There is a fairly high chance any online course would turn out to be at 3am for me or something. But it still sounds wonderful!

    in learning
    runner

    Leave a comment:


  • Mary
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    It looks like you might be the first here on the forum to attempt this!

    I can't speak to using the programs as an adult, but I did take Traditional Logic I and II as a student at HLS. The programs are written directly to the student, and lesson plans are built into the workbook. For example, in each chapter you will be told to read X sections and then complete Y problems, followed by reading further sections and answering further questions the next day. Obviously I'm biased as I work for MP, but I do believe Martin's Traditional Logic program is very approachable and manageable, presenting challenging material as clearly and concisely as possible.

    HTH!

    I did Logic I and II myself a few years ago. I bought the entire sets because I had never taken a logic course and I wanted to know more about it. (My husband was a member of the Philodemic Society and is Mister Logic around here - I secretly just wanted to win a friendly argument at the dinner table, just once!) I really, truly enjoyed it and had no trouble keeping up or understanding the material. The best part? I can hold my own with my husband as we debate certain issues. *Yesss!*

    On a slightly related topic, I had registered to take the adult classics course offered by MP this past fall. We were supposed to read the Iliad, Oddyssey, Aeneid, Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso. Sadly, there was not enough interest and the course was canceled. I still have all of my books and workbooks but I'm afraid to attempt this solo. Does MP have any plans to try this again? And would anyone here be interested?

    Leave a comment:


  • sarahandrew
    replied
    I bought the Aeneid study guide over a year ago and have only just started it. I am amazed at how much benefit I am getting from the study guide. Even though I'm taking it slow. My husband and I alternate Sunday afternoons off, and on his Sunday afternoon off I'm at home with the kids and have an opportunity to get a little bit more done.

    I read 'Inferno' from the Divine Comedy for book club last year and I SO could have done with the MP study guide. I was amazed though, at how many more references I got having done the Greek Myths that I have done with my daughter (we're about halfway through). In fact, not just in 'Inferno', there seem to be references to Greek Myths in so many books that I just wouldn't have noticed before!

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Originally posted by Runner View Post


    This is is an interesting topic. Do you think homeschoolers are more interested in self education than the general population? I don’t know of a single person who studies stuff for fun (ie non vocational) except homeschooling (and ex homeschooling) parents.

    Runner
    I think homeschoolers are more tuned-in to what regular study does for you (answering the thirst for knowledge we all have), which can be why they tend to appear to be more interested. I think they also have a tendency to have the time that it takes to find areas of particular interest and delve as deeply as they want - which is even more of an ignition switch to light a fire of knowledge-seeking. But people who find what they love to do, or who have a strong area of interest as their primary hobby, have a tendency to continue learning about it all throughout their lives, too. I think it comes down to needing to have a motivation to do it (i.e. the ingrained desire for knowledge), and homeschoolers tend to find that motivation easily, whereas others have missed it for most of their lives.

    Conversely, most folks who go through the educational system and simply get "some job" never experience that joy of real knowledge at all, and therefore could care less about continuing their education or doing any kind of self-study.

    AMDG,
    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    Sometimes I think it takes trying to teach a subject for one to realize
    1. How much they never learned
    2. How much they have forgotten

    homeschooling a child can bring these into focus quite quickly

    i also think homeschoolers are more aware of the resources available for self education

    Leave a comment:


  • Runner
    replied
    Originally posted by howiecram View Post
    I was considering it, but could not decide “where to start”. I just say I am working at 2nd grade right now! I hope to follow along with my oldest. We shall see how that goes!
    I asked, sometime last year and an MP rep, (I can’’t remember which one) suggested I start with Ancient Greece, then move onto Rome, followed by the Middle Ages, fitting in other things as and when they took my fancy. It took me longer to get started than I expected but now I am well underway. I have done “Getting Started in Latin” which is not MP but was a wonderful introduction, and I am plucking up the courage to do first form. Working along with your kids can work, but as they get older they do more independent work, and ones time tends to be spent on the littles. I think you’d do better working along with your youngest! Maybe just get one thing to do for fun, for yourself, and the kids will use the book later so it’s not a waste.

    Michael, thank you for your response. It’s very interesting to hear from people who have actually worked through the programme. I think I might give it a try next. I’m not too sure about maths, so maybe I could give logic a try.

    This is is an interesting topic. Do you think homeschoolers are more interested in self education than the general population? I don’t know of a single person who studies stuff for fun (ie non vocational) except homeschooling (and ex homeschooling) parents.

    Runner

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Runner View Post
    I’m also considering the logic programmes. Has anyone done these as an adult?
    Runner.
    It looks like you might be the first here on the forum to attempt this!

    I can't speak to using the programs as an adult, but I did take Traditional Logic I and II as a student at HLS. The programs are written directly to the student, and lesson plans are built into the workbook. For example, in each chapter you will be told to read X sections and then complete Y problems, followed by reading further sections and answering further questions the next day. Obviously I'm biased as I work for MP, but I do believe Martin's Traditional Logic program is very approachable and manageable, presenting challenging material as clearly and concisely as possible.

    HTH!

    Leave a comment:


  • howiecram
    replied
    I was considering it, but could not decide “where to start”. I just say I am working at 2nd grade right now! I hope to follow along with my oldest. We shall see how that goes!

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Cathy,
    I love this recommendation! I listened to the Divine Comedy this winter and am hungry for more. My oldest will do it in two years (11th) but maybe I'll beat him to the Teacher Guide.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheAttachedMama
    replied
    I have also used the MP Teacher Guide for Dante. I found it INVALUABLE. I was reading it with my "classical book club"---and I got so much more out of the reading compared to the people who attempted to wade through the material without any type of guide. I found myself pointing out all of these really cool references that they totally passed over and didn't understand. Most of all, the guide helped me fall in love with the material. I found myself continually saying, "WOW! This book is truly a work of art."

    Many who attempted to read it on their own said they didn't like the material, and I think it was because it can be hard to fully understand in this day in age (let alone appreciate!) without a decent translation and a guide to help you along the way. I also found the translation recommended by MP for Dante to be fabulous. The language was beautiful and it was understandable. Additionally, the foundation of the elementary MP education helped me to read the text.

    Leave a comment:


  • Runner
    replied
    I’m also considering the logic programmes. Has anyone done these as an adult?
    Runner.

    Leave a comment:

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