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  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Originally posted by Mary View Post

    Ugh - I hate being tied up and away from the forum for weeks at a time. I, think we must have had the same Jeeves audiobook! I remember being so excited to listen to Wodehouse on one of my trips to KY only to hear an American man butchering the accent and some of the words (my apologies to B.J. Harrison - I'm sure he is a lovely person). Certain things are set in stone. Only Patricia Routledge can play Hyacinth Bucket. Tim Robbins is the only man who can read The Great Gatsby. And only Jonathan Cecil or Alexander Spencer should be allowed to record Wodehouse audiobooks.

    It's okay to not like Tolkein. I don't love TLoTR series but I did very much enjoy the Hobbit. I also didn't love Lewis' Space Trilogy, but I thought The Screwtape Letters was masterful. I find different opinions to be fascinating and I learn a lot from listening to people who don't agree with me (thought I am still trying to master the art of holding my tongue).
    HOLD the phone.

    I didn't know Tim Robbins read GG. Maybe I would have enjoyed it more, if I had listened to him.

    I felt like I was lost in a never ending episode of Mad Men --- beautiful imagery, but deplorable characters.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mary
    replied
    Originally posted by tanya View Post
    Bethany and Michael are breaking my heart into little pieces. But that's okay. I don't like Tolkien. (Did I say that out loud?) I do agree with you, Mary, that the reader on an audiobook can make or break it. I once mistakenly got a Jeeves book with an American reader. Ridiculous.

    Tanya
    Ugh - I hate being tied up and away from the forum for weeks at a time. I, think we must have had the same Jeeves audiobook! I remember being so excited to listen to Wodehouse on one of my trips to KY only to hear an American man butchering the accent and some of the words (my apologies to B.J. Harrison - I'm sure he is a lovely person). Certain things are set in stone. Only Patricia Routledge can play Hyacinth Bucket. Tim Robbins is the only man who can read The Great Gatsby. And only Jonathan Cecil or Alexander Spencer should be allowed to record Wodehouse audiobooks.

    It's okay to not like Tolkein. I don't love TLoTR series but I did very much enjoy the Hobbit. I also didn't love Lewis' Space Trilogy, but I thought The Screwtape Letters was masterful. I find different opinions to be fascinating and I learn a lot from listening to people who don't agree with me (thought I am still trying to master the art of holding my tongue).

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Originally posted by Cindy in Indy View Post
    Jessica,
    DC is my favorite Dickens. And it makes me cry terribly.
    My daughter visited a living history 1800's museum this week and paused to view a silhouette where the curators listed what people in her age group would typically do in a day/week. (Female in her 20's). She was very sobered, and said, "my generation has no idea what hardship is". How true!
    Oh, that makes me happy to persevere with DC! Did your daughter happen to photograph that list? I would love to see it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cindy in Indy
    replied
    Jessica,
    DC is my favorite Dickens. And it makes me cry terribly.
    My daughter visited a living history 1800's museum this week and paused to view a silhouette where the curators listed what people in her age group would typically do in a day/week. (Female in her 20's). She was very sobered, and said, "my generation has no idea what hardship is". How true!

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    I'm listening to David Copperfield for the first time (more Ralph Cosham, of course!) and had the tender revelation that I've never been poor or wretched a day in my life. I'm tempted to think myself both from time to time. Dickens can be tough to listen to because of all the poverty and wretchedness, but it can also be a very healthy corrective. That's how it feels for me today. I'm sticking with the story even when it smarts.

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Richard Armitage reading Dickens.

    Check it out.

    And duck the tomatoes coming at y'all from the K household re: Dickens and Tolkien.

    AMDG,
    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • The Autumn Oak
    replied
    Originally posted by momgineer View Post
    Turns out what I remembered from high school was Lord of the Flies.
    I remember that too, probably more than anything else I read in high school...

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Originally posted by momgineer View Post
    Turns out what I remembered from high school was Lord of the Flies.
    Laughing so hard at this!

    Leave a comment:


  • tanya
    replied
    Tahara,

    This made me laugh out loud. Thanks for adding light to my day!

    Tanya

    Leave a comment:


  • momgineer
    replied
    I also never read Tolkien till I was married with kids. When the movies were coming out, I bought a cheap boxed set to read because everyone was raving about it. I thought I remembered reading it in high school and thinking it was disturbing. When I actually read it, I LOVED it! Turns out what I remembered from high school was Lord of the Flies.

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Tahara,
    I did not read LOTR or The Hobbit until I was an adult, nor could I have told you who JRRT was before college. I scrambled to read LOTR before the movies came out in my early 20s. My husband and I shared a huge paperback copy that, to my memory, had 3,000 pages. It was probably more like 1,200.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Autumn Oak
    replied
    I also have never read "The Hobbit" or "The Lord of the Rings"...My oldest read "The Hobbit" when he did it in MP...He was 13, and the very first time he ever went to the movie theatre was to see "The Hobbit" after studying it...It was different than the book, but he enjoyed it...

    TLOTR I had never even heard of until my husband wanted to see it when the first movie came out...I did not realize there where 3 parts to this movie...I watched the first part, then looked at my husband and said this was a waste of time...They spent forever talking about this ring, and nothing was done to resolve anything...It is nice that those people are going to journey together, but whatever happened with that?...They should have told us something...My husband chuckled, then told me that this was only part 1 of 3...Info I should have had beforehand ????

    Tahara

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Originally posted by momgineer View Post
    I tried the Space Trilogy and only got half way through the first book. I need to try again because I hear it is amazing and much better than Narnia as far as deep ideas.
    The triology is SO good, Debbie. I found Out of the Silent Planet, well...solitary? I was expecting a "fellowship" feel with many characters and there just weren't many. Perelandra is fascinating. Again, there are fewer characters but the conversations are brilliant. That Hideous Strength is so relevant it's scary. Set on Earth, Lewis weaves in many things that are truly prophetic about our day. There's the bonus of some Arthurian legend mixed in as well. Those interested in medieval cosmology (a la The Discarded Image) will really enjoy this trilogy. As I often mention, I am a huge fan of listening to Ralph Cosham read these.

    Leave a comment:


  • momgineer
    replied
    Yes, Hobbit isn’t that great of a book. It’s good, but not amazing. LOTR in the other hand.... it does have some seemingly slow places, but it all builds up and has deep insights into human nature and what we are created for.
    Funny that I just can’t get into C.S. Lewis. I’ve read Narnia and it’s ok- about like the Hobbit. Good literature but nothing amazingly deep. Maybe I’m too Tolkienish in my distaste for direct allegory. I tried the Space Trilogy and only got half way through the first book. I need to try again because I hear it is amazing and much better than Narnia as far as deep ideas.

    Leave a comment:


  • MBentley
    replied
    tanya

    I...don't like Tolkien either. I've tried. To be fair, even Tolkien said he didn't think the Hobbit was a good book originally. I read them after seeing the movies. I do love the movies - especially the latest incarnation of Bilbo. That character finally makes more sense to me. Gollum is creepy.

    But I Love, love love love....C.S. Lewis. If you could do all of the literature guides for Narnia, I seriously, would put you on that Christmas Card list forever. I mean it.

    Fun fact: I love the books so much that I contacted the C.S. Lewis foundation about making a quilt to enter into a quilt show based on his novels. They approved it! I literally have permission to use their material. Still get the shivers. Haven't started it yet because I don't have the skill yet, and it will take 5+ years to complete. I'll just squeeze that in with multiple core MP.....

    Leave a comment:

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