Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Use of Non Latin Proper Nouns

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Use of Non Latin Proper Nouns

    How would I use a non Latin proper noun?

    With normal Latin nouns: Regina laudat (the queen praises) or Reginam laudat (hsi praises the queen).

    How do I do this with a non Latin noun?

    Ex. Clay praises (Clay laudat), but how can I say 'hsi praises Clay'?

    Clay cannot be declined because Clay does not belong to any declinsion.
    So how do I indicate that 'Clay' is to recieve the action?

    Thanks for any insight!

    Ps. Same question for plurality. How do I indicate plurality on a non Latin noun, while in a Latin sentance?
    Last edited by Clay Suskalo; 04-16-2012 at 02:09 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    169

    Default

    There really isn't a general rule for how to do this. The Romans sometime put a foreign proper noun into a declension if they could do it easily, or they would make an irregular declension or occasionally make the word indeclinable. For modern English proper nouns, if it's a name, the easiest way is to make the name fit into one of the declensions. If you have learned third-declension nouns, that declension is often the easiest to use. For example, you could change "Clay" to "Clay Clayis," etc. A favorite of children (but often the silliest) way is to add -us (2nd declension) to a man's name and -a (1st declension) to a woman's name. Clay would be Clayus. Basically, whatever sounds good to you is okay, as you are essentially creating a new Latin word that Classical writers would never have used because, for example, they would not have met an English speaker named Clay
    Michael
    Memoria Press

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Hi Clay,

    You could also take the meaning of the name and find the latin equivalent. Since I understand Clay to mean precisely earthen clay, you could use as names the latin words lutum or argilla, etc.

    Argillus sounds pretty neat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    169

    Default

    mythopoeic,

    While I doubt the Romans would have used Argillus as a first name, they may have used a word like that as a nickname or a title (Roman examples are Cunctator and Africanus). Personally, I like Argillus, and I like the way you came up with it. Very clever.
    Michael
    Memoria Press

Similar Threads

  1. 5th Grade Latin: Transition from another curriculum
    By Marnie in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-11-2011, 07:55 PM
  2. Latin Curriculum Progression
    By everlastingstarflower in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-21-2011, 08:49 AM
  3. Latin direction needed
    By strider in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-07-2008, 01:54 PM
  4. Frequently Used Latin Verbs & Nouns
    By Barry Phillips in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-15-2005, 09:24 AM
  5. What to start with - son some Latin experience/ mom none
    By Anonymous in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-18-2004, 10:41 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •