Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: A Latin Centered Curriculum?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    28

    Default A Latin Centered Curriculum?

    Hello, I have two children that I want to embark on the Classical curriculum by purchasing the packages for each grade level. We homeschool. They will be starting in Kindergarten. Their brothers are enrolled in Christian Liberty Academy correspondence school and are in high school.
    After reading the book "A Latin Centered Curriculum," by Andrew Campbell and Ms. Lowe's own words in her study guide called "introduction to Classical Studies," :"Latin and classical studies form an integrated unit study.....Latin study takes the place of most English language arts curricula." (pg 6), I am confused. It seems to me that the curriculum packages for each grade level are packed with material. If you take grade 6 for example, students are learning classical history, american history, classical writing, Rod and Staff English (which has its own writing program), Rod and Staff Spelling, Latin, and Bible, and Literature! This seems overwhelming and it is very similar to their brothers' non classical preparatory curriculum in the number of subjects that must be accomplished. Please explain how all this fits in with the concept of a Latin-centered curriculum! Although I think the overall plan in MP's Classical Curriculum is right on, I am wondering if it is too ambitious for students. I want my daughters to succeed in the curriculum and not be miserable. Any thoughts/guidance/exhortation appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Allen, TX
    Posts
    186

    Default possiblity

    Hi Angelique,
    I have also been using Campbell's Latin-Centered Curriculum as a guide for my children's education. I think one reason that Memoria Press still includes the Rod & Staff English and Spelling plans is that there are families using the curriculum that do not want to study Latin or maybe only study word origins. And some people need the comfort of closely following a school model. I have previously put together my own lesson plans, but am now switching to Memoria Press plans (modified) due to having a large family. But I will be leaving out the spelling and English. In third grade I will leave out D'Aulaire's Greek Myths (my sons have read through it and other books on Greek and Roman mythology). I also have not used the literature guides prior to fifth grade, as my children are all voracious readers but already have more than enough written work to do. I would love to see some sort of study guides to go along with Black Ships Before Troy and Campbell's other recommended readings. Memoria Press is the curriculum provider that seems to come closest to Campbell's model. You just have to tweak it a little bit.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 14
    ds 11
    ds 9
    ds 7
    dd almost 5
    ds 2
    dd still in progress

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    43

    Default

    We have been using the 4th grade lesson plans this year with only minor changes. It sounds like a lot of work, but, really, the way the lesson plans are laid out, it is not too much to do each day. The history/geography/science/Bible are only one day per week. The daily subjects do not take an inordinate amount of time either. Rod and staff math has lots of exercises, so you can easily do 1/2 of the problems and still have plenty. We start with the odd problems, and if needed we go back and do more. Same with English- just do the main lesson or just the worksheet. The lessons are very short. The literature is a lot less than in other curricula we have used- they are only reading four or five novels over the course of an entire year.

    I understand the idea of Latin study replacing grammar, but I find it is better to reinforce it with Rod and Staff, especially in elementary school. The spelling is probably overkill, but again, it is maybe 15 minutes per day.

    I should also mention that we usually only do school 4 days per week, so if you are efficient you should have no trouble at all with the 5-day schedule. Don't be intimidated! It has been a great year for us with MP!
    Liz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Allen, TX
    Posts
    186

    Default Kindergarten

    I did want to mention that I have just started using Memoria Press' Kindergarten curriculum. It may not follow LCC's recommendations exactly, but I am finding it to be a well-planned, gentle approach to kindergarten. The supplemental read-alouds are a nice touch, because we had already been through pretty much everything on Campbell's reading list for this age group and some other recommended reading lists. (This is my fifth kindergartener.) I really like the art and music selections and the fact that not all of the poetry is from A Child's Garden of Verses. I make sure to hit the big three subjects every day and recitation. I haven't had a day yet where I didn't have time to do the enrichment activities. It definitely does not take up an entire morning, which is great with an active toddler and older students.
    Remember that you can buy the entire curriculum package or buy the lesson plans and only those subjects that you intend to use.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 14
    ds 11
    ds 9
    ds 7
    dd almost 5
    ds 2
    dd still in progress

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    28

    Default thanks

    Thanks Jude and Liz for your replies. I was hoping to hear that the lesson plans were not overwhelming and that you had experience with the curriculum, so I am encouraged. I initially did not understand why the LCC works in theory but not in practice, but homeschooling gives me great flexibility. I think MP needs to include a lot of material to not only satisfy general curriculum needs and requirements, but also to ensure students perform well on annual standardized tests. These latter two elements not so much a concern for ourselves at this juncture.
    Thanks again I really appreciate your input on these forums!
    angie

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,620

    Default

    Hello, Angie.

    Our curriculum comes directly out of our classrooms at Highlands Latin School. Our teachers have written it, and it is what they teach. Our students consistently score in the 99% percentile on the ITBS, which we give to students in grades K-8 every year. We aren't teaching to a test because we were using this curriculum before we began testing our students. But it does reassure us that our instincts were good when writing this curriculum, if you want to judge us by a standardized test. You can look at what we are doing on our website: www.TheLatinSchool.org.

    Regards,

    Tanya Charlton

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    28

    Default Expect Great Things

    Thank you Tanya for your reply. I have been pondering the classical education route for several years now. Fortunately, I have 2 children left to educate and really get it right this time. If HLS students are able to do this, certainly my daughters can. I played with the Latin and the Classical studies preparatory books with my older two, but then felt that maybe we shouldn't be spending so much time on pagan writers, those living in rebellion against God. After reading much on your website and other books, I know now that there is no comparison between a classical education and the standard fare at American schools, whether they be online or otherwise. I also admit that I was timid, as I have not read these Great Books myself and lacked confidence in teaching them. But in the end, I have not expected the things I should have from my students. I have not expected Great Things. But, with the support of MP I can give them that rare education that not only teaches but delights and moves, and that is exciting. All for the glory of God!
    angie
    Last edited by angelique; 01-20-2012 at 08:43 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,620

    Default

    Angie,

    I am totally amazed at what our students can do! I think you will be glad you have made this decision. Know that we will always be a resource for you, helping you along the way so that it's not too overwhelming. And think how smart you will be as you study with them!

    Cheers,

    Tanya

Similar Threads

  1. 5th Grade Latin: Transition from another curriculum
    By Marnie in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-11-2011, 06:55 PM
  2. Latin Curriculum Progression
    By everlastingstarflower in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-21-2011, 08:49 AM
  3. Highlands Latin School Curriculum
    By cshannon in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-05-2010, 12:14 PM
  4. Latin direction needed
    By strider in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-07-2008, 01:54 PM
  5. Latin Centered Curriculum
    By beltran4christ in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-08-2006, 11:30 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •